oar


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stick (one's) oar in(to) (something)

1. To offer or express one's opinion (on some matter), even though it was not asked for or desired. Primarily heard in UK. I don't know why you feel you have to stick your oar into every dispute Terry and I are having. The members of the board are perfectly capable of arriving at a decision of their own accord, so I'll thank you for not sticking your oar in, Tom.
2. To involve oneself in an intrusive or nosy manner into something that is not one's business or responsibility. Primarily heard in UK. I wish my neighbors would quit sticking their oars in and just leave us alone! Liam, don't stick your oar into your brother's affairs—he can manage well enough on his own.
See also: oar, stick

rest on (one's) oars

To relax after achieving a goal or doing a physically strenuous activity (such as rowing, as the phrase suggests). I know you're happy to have won the election, but you can't just rest on your oars—you need to start planning your first act as class president now. After painting all morning, I had to rest on my oars for a bit before I moved on to the next room.
See also: oar, on, rest

put (one's) oar in(to) (something)

1. To offer or express one's opinion (on some matter), even though it was not asked for or desired. I don't know why you feel you have to put your oar into every dispute Terry and I are having. The members of the board are perfectly capable of arriving at a decision of their own accord, so I'll thank you for not putting your oar in, Tom.
2. To involve oneself in an intrusive or nosy manner into something that is not one's business or responsibility. I wish my neighbors would quit putting their oars in and just leave us alone! Liam, don't put your oar into your brother's affairs—he can manage well enough on his own.
See also: oar, put

have both oars in the water

To be and remain in a calm, stable, sensible, and pragmatic state or condition; to not be subject to extreme emotional reactions or affected by exceptional changes in one's situation. My father has always been a rock of level-headed judgment and advice. Even during our family's lowest points, he was always able to have both oars in the water. It's clear to see from his handling of the young team this season that he's a coach who has both oars in the water.
See also: both, have, oar, water

keep both oars in the water

To be and remain in a calm, stable, sensible, and pragmatic state or condition; to not be subject to extreme emotional reactions or affected by exceptional changes in one's situation. My father has always been a rock of level-headed judgment and advice. Even during our family's lowest points, he was always able to keep both oars in the water. It's clear to see from his handling of the young team this season that he's a coach who keeps both oars in the water.
See also: both, keep, oar, water

with both oars in the water

Remaining in a calm, stable, sensible, and pragmatic state or condition. It's clear to see from his handling of the young team this season that he's a coach with both oars in the water. You need to approach this trial with both oars in the water—if you let your emotions get the better of you, it could end up costing the company millions.
See also: both, oar, water

have just one oar in the water

Rur. to not be thinking clearly. Tom has some crazy plan for opening his own restaurant. If you ask me, he has just one oar in the water. She has just one oar in the water if she thinks Bill is going to pay any attention to her.
See also: have, just, oar, one, water

put one's oar in

 and stick one's oar in; put one's two cents(' worth) in
Fig. to add one's comments or opinion, even if unwanted or unasked for. You don't need to put your oar in. I don't need your advice. I'm sorry. I shouldn't have stuck my oar in when you were arguing with your wife. Do you mind if I put in my oar? I have a suggestion. There is no need for you to put in your two cents' worth.
See also: oar, put

put one's oar in

Interfere with something or insert one's opinion, as in I'll thank you not to put your oar in when we're discussing a private matter. This term, referring to helping to row a boat, was first recorded in Charles Coffey's 1731 play The Devil to Pay: "I will govern my own house without your putting in an oar."
See also: oar, put

put your oar in (something)

or

stick your oar in (something)

mainly BRITISH, INFORMAL
If someone puts their oar in or sticks their oar in, they interfere in a situation or an argument. He let them say what they wanted to say without feeling the need to put his oar in; he is obviously a good listener. He should try to sort out his own affairs instead of sticking his oar in other people's business. Note: This comes from an old expression `to have an oar in every man's boat', meaning to interfere in other people's business.
See also: oar, put

rest on your oars

or

lean on your oars

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If a person or organization rests on their oars or leans on their oars, they do not work hard enough to make sure that they remain successful or get things done. The company has been resting on its oars and its competitors are catching up. Firms often take their time over making necessary changes, leaning on their oars while another study is done and another year goes by.
See also: oar, on, rest

keep both oars in the water

maintain a calm equilibrium in your life and affairs.
See also: both, keep, oar, water

rest on your oars

1 cease rowing by leaning on the handles of your oars, thereby lifting them horizontally out of the water. 2 relax your efforts.
A US variant of this phrase is lay on your oars .
See also: oar, on, rest

stick (or poke or put or shove) your oar in

give an opinion or advice without being asked. informal
1992 Daily Telegraph My only minor fault is I sometimes like putting my oar in…and my advice can be a little brutal.
See also: oar, stick

put/stick your ˈoar in

(British English, informal) interfere in the affairs of other people: This project is nothing to do with Dave. Why does he keep trying to stick his oar in all the time?
See also: oar, put, stick
References in periodicals archive ?
Ipswich Town winger Tommy Oar in League Cup action against Manchester United at Old Trafford.
Sweep" rowing refers to one person with an oar who usually rows from a preferred side of the boat.
2d MI Battalion realized long before OAR the need to maintain trained and validated intelligence teams to support the myriad requirements emerging from both USAREUR and U.
Unless, of course, you were a kid, because you quickly learned how to send a spray of water from an oar with the accuracy of a water hose; a necessary ability in a water fight.
Cold temperatures may be its operating scenario, but it seems the team at IMZ-Ural have a warm sense of humour with a tongue-in-cheek warning on the oar.
Check it out now: Commemorative Rowing Oar http://r.
Each rower has one oar with two on the stroke (right side) and two on the bow (left side).
SL Green is enthusiastic about oar new relationship with one of the nation's most highly recognized environmental organizations, joining a shortlist of noteworthy program participants, recognizing our commitment toward market leading initiatives and innovation delivering efficiency, value and health for oar business, tenants, and community," said Jay Black, SL Green's director of sustainability.
After 31 minutes the race was re-started and Cambridge went on to win after Oxford broke an oar.
The 158th Boat Race was eventually restarted and Cambridge powered to victory after Oxford suffered another setback with a broken oar.
When the race restarted Cambridge powered to victory after Oxford suffered another setback with a broken oar.
AUSSIE ace Tommy Oar reckons his countrymen will be crowded around TV sets watching Utrecht take on Celtic.
The analysis of the existing designs [4] shows that although loading of the rower is analyzed comprehensively [5-7], none of them [8] allows to simulate the real loading on the oar sufficiently.
3 : a connection by which one thing is joined to another <The attachment that connects the oar to the rowboat is broken.
In another consolidation, Evolve Capital made a share offer for Blue Oar stockbrokers, valuing the company at pounds 17.