nutshell

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in a nutshell

In summary; concisely. In a nutshell, the app helps you to plan parties. I don't want the long version—just tell me what your thesis is in a nutshell.
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put it in a nutshell

To summarize or describe something in only a few words. To put it in a nutshell, the servers are crashing because of an issue with our power supply. Let me put it in a nutshell for you—if you show up late again, you're fired!
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put something in a nutshell

Fig. to state something very concisely. (Alludes to the small size of a nutshell and the amount that it would hold.) The explanation is long and involved, but let me put it in a nutshell for you. To put it in a nutshell: you are fired!
See also: nutshell, put

in a nutshell

Concisely, in a few words, as in Here's our proposal-in a nutshell, we want to sell the business to you. This hyperbolic expression alludes to the Roman writer Pliny's description of Homer's Iliad being copied in so tiny a hand that it could fit in a nutshell. For a time it referred to anything compressed, but from the 1500s on it referred mainly to written or spoken words.
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in a nutshell

COMMON You say in a nutshell when you are describing something very briefly. She wants me to leave the company. I want to stay. That's it in a nutshell. I don't know what I'm doing and I guess that's the problem in a nutshell.
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in a nutshell

in the fewest possible words.
A nutshell is a traditional metaphor for a very small space. It is used by Shakespeare in Hamlet: ‘I could be bounded in a nutshell, and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams’.
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(put something) in a ˈnutshell

(informal) (say or express something) in a very clear way, using few words: Unemployment is rising, prices are increasing; in a nutshell, the economy is in trouble.‘Do you like his idea?’ ‘To put it in a nutshell, no.’
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in a nutshell

In a few words; concisely: Just give me the facts in a nutshell.
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in a nutshell

Concisely or compactly, usually referring to written or spoken words. The Roman writer Pliny in his Natural History stated that Homer’s great (and very long) epic poem, the Iliad, was copied in such tiny handwriting that the whole text could be enclosed in a nutshell. This obvious hyperbole caught the imagination of numerous subsequent writers who referred to “the Iliad in a nutshell,” among them Jonathan Swift and Thomas Carlyle. Later “the Iliad” was dropped and anything extremely compressed was described as being in a nutshell, a cliché since the mid-nineteenth century. See also in a word.
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References in periodicals archive ?
International Trade and Economic Relations in a Nutshell, 6th Edition
One of the benefits of cracking fresh nuts is that you tend to eat fewer because you have to work for each bite, but we still accumulate a good amount of nutshells. While these could go into the compost bin, they tend to decompose much slower than other kitchen waste, so we've started using them as fire kindling instead.
Whenever we find ourselves with a fire in the woodstove that is nearly out, or that needs a boost because of the presence of damp wood, we toss in a handful or two of the nutshells. The effect is explosive.
Weighing just 15 grams, the only specimen of the yet-unnamed species sports orangey fur, impressive fountains of whiskers, a long rail, and a jaw powerful enough to crack nutshells. Judging from physical characteristics, it does not fit into any of the three evolutionary clusters that contain e dozens of other mouse and rat species unique to the Philippines, says Eric Rickart of the Utah Museum of Natural History in Salt Lake City.
"And the nutshells we're working with are renewable on a yearly basis."
"We also hope to do more work with some of the other harder nutshells, like those of hazelnuts, black walnuts, and Brazil nuts, and to try to investigate the properties that make them a good air sampling carbon," says Wartelle.
But the nutshells, when activated, release very little.
The team, looking to collaborate with industry, recently negotiated a cooperative agreement with a Georgia-based firm to test granular forms of the nutshell carbons.
Of the nutshell carbons examined thus far, macadamias adsorb the broadest range of organic molecules.
The models, meticulously handcrafted by Lee, are known as 'The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death'.