nurse


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Related to nurse: registered nurse

nurse (one's) drink

To consume one's beverage, especially alcohol, rather slowly, either as a means of conserving it or to avoid getting drunk. I spent too much money and got drunk too often when I would go to bars in college, so I've learned to nurse my drinks when I go out nowadays.
See also: drink, nurse

nurse a serpent in (one's) bosom

To befriend, look after, or take care of someone who proves to be traitorous, untrustworthy, deceitful, or ungrateful. (A less common variant of "nurse a viper in one's bosom.") I thought the profligate had seen the light and was seeking redemption, and so I took him into my care. But before long, I knew I had nursed a serpent in my bosom, as I awoke one morning to find myself robbed blind! I thought our love was not only mutual but indestructible; and yet, I have nursed a serpent in my bosom all these years: my darling husband has cast me out and run off with a younger woman.
See also: bosom, nurse, serpent

nurse a viper in (one's) bosom

To befriend, look after, or take care of someone who proves to be traitorous, untrustworthy, deceitful, or ungrateful. I thought the profligate had seen the light and was seeking redemption, and so I took him into my care. But before long, I knew I had nursed a viper in my bosom, as I awoke one morning to find myself robbed blind! I thought our love was not only mutual but indestructible; and yet, I have nursed a viper in my bosom all these years: my darling husband has cast me out and run off with a younger woman.
See also: bosom, nurse, viper

nurse a snake in (one's) bosom

To befriend, look after, or take care of someone who proves to be traitorous, untrustworthy, deceitful, or ungrateful. I thought the profligate had seen the light and was seeking redemption, and so I took him into my care. But before long, I knew I had nursed a snake in my bosom, as I awoke one morning to find myself robbed blind! I thought our love was not only mutual but indestructible; and yet, I have nursed a snake in my bosom all these years: my darling husband has cast me out and run off with a younger woman.
See also: bosom, nurse, snake

nurse a drink

To consume a beverage, especially alcohol, rather slowly, either as a means of conserving it or to avoid getting drunk. I spent too much money and got drunk too often when I would go to bars in college, so I've learned to just nurse a drink or two when I go out nowadays.
See also: drink, nurse

nurse a grudge (against one)

To harbor persistent and continual resentment or ill feelings toward one, especially for some slight or wrongdoing one committed in the past. Johnny has been nursing a grudge against me since we were 12 because I embarrassed him in front of a girl he liked. Samantha is just so forgiving—I don't think she's ever nursed a grudge in her life!
See also: grudge, nurse

nurse a grudge (against someone)

Fig. to keep resenting and disliking someone over a period of time. (Usually implies that it has been an unreasonably long time.) Sally is still nursing a grudge against Mary. How long can anyone nurse a grudge?
See also: grudge, nurse

nurse someone back to health

to care for a sick person until good health returns. Sally was glad to help nurse her mother back to health. She nursed her children back to health when they all had the flu.
See also: back, health, nurse

nurse someone (or an animal) along

to aid or encourage the well-being or return to health of someone or an animal. She nursed the old man along for a few years until he died. She nursed along the invalid. The vet nursed the horse along for the rest of the night. He nursed himself along with chicken noodle soup and hot baths until the virus ran its course.
See also: nurse

nurse someone through (something)

to care for a sick person during the worst part of a sickness or recovery. There was no one there to nurse him through the worst part of his illness. It was a horrible ordeal, but John nursed her through.
See also: nurse, through

nurse something along

Fig. to manage something with care and thrift. (See also nurse someone or an animal along.) The board of directors agreed to nurse the firm along for a while and then sell it. She nursed along the failing business until it was showing a profit.
See also: nurse

nurse a drink

Consume a drink slowly, especially in order to conserve it. For example, He nursed one drink for the whole evening. This idiom alludes to holding a glass very carefully, as one might a child. [c. 1940]
See also: drink, nurse

nurse a grudge

Bear resentment for a long time, as in We don't know why Karl looks so angry; I think he's nursing a grudge against the family. This expression uses nurse in the sense of "foster a feeling," a usage dating from the mid-1700s.
See also: grudge, nurse
References in classic literature ?
She drew her chair closer to the chest on which the nurse was sitting.
As the darkness fell on the two women the nurse spoke.
The nurse had dressed Lady Glyde, with excellent forethought, in a bonnet, veil, and shawl of her own.
The nurse consented to follow these suggestions, the more readily as they offered her the means of securing herself against any worse consequences than the loss of her place, by remaining in the Asylum, and so maintaining the appearance of innocence, at least.
The nurse, on the first night in the Asylum, had shown her the marks on each article of her underclothing as it was taken off, and had said, not at all irritably or unkindly, "Look at your own name on your own clothes, and don't worry us all any more about being Lady Glyde.
The unfortunate woman's last idea in connection with Sir Percival was the idea of annoying and distressing him, and of elevating herself, as she supposed, in the estimation of the patients and nurses, by assuming the character of his deceased wife, the scheme of this personation having evidently occurred to her after a stolen interview which she had succeeded in obtaining with Lady Glyde, and at which she had observed the extraordinary accidental likeness between the deceased lady and herself.
One of the nurses volunteered to conduct Miss Halcombe to the place, the proprietor of the Asylum remaining in the house for a few minutes to attend to a case which required his services, and then engaging to join his visitor in the grounds.
Because nurse managed health centers partner with communities in which they serve, they are an excellent venue to implement community service and learning activities.
While each team member has a role in the immediate care of the victim, the forensic nurse cuts off his clothes, careful to avoid the bloody hole where the bullet pierced his shirt.
The team includes nurse educators, nursing home administrators, a pharmacist, a social worker, and a registered nurse assessment coordinator.
Registered nurse Carmen Lopez wants a raise--so she's leaving Mexico and moving to California to take a job at Desert Valley Medical, a hospital near Los Angeles, where her income will increase tenfold.
Group, a nurse, and Roberts, a social psychologist, epitomize the problems that non-professional historians often have when attempting to write history.
Susan, the "head nurse," was also the nurse for the camp last year immediately following her own nursing graduation.
I've been a director for over 20 years and it just isn't fun anymore," laments one nurse.
In 1893 Wald, a nurse and social worker, founded the Visiting Nurse Service of New York with 10 nurses.