notice

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advance notice

A notification, signal, or sign that something is going to happen or is expected to happen. I know that we were all surprised that Dad decided to move to China, but I think his learning Mandarin last year was something of an advance notice.
See also: advance, notice

take no notice of (something or someone)

To not pay any attention to someone or something; to ignore or disregard someone or something. Take no notice of those troublemakers, they're only trying to provoke you. I was so distracted with thoughts of tomorrow's exam that I took no notice of where I was walking and stepped right out into the road!
See also: notice, of, take

at a moment's notice

With little time to prepare; immediately and at any time. Firefighters need to be able to spring into action at a moment's notice. I can't give a speech at a moment's notice!
See also: notice

come to attention

Of military personnel, to stand at attention (which, in most cases, means looking forward and standing erect with one's arms at one's sides). When they heard the drill sergeant's call, the troops abruptly stopped marching and came to attention.
See also: attention, come

escape (one's) notice

To avoid being seen. I doubt you will escape people's notice if you show up at the party in a floor-length sequined gown.
See also: escape, notice

make (one) sit up and take notice

To cause someone to become alert and give his or her complete attention. Although he's been making music for years, it was his smash hit song last April that made people sit up and take notice. The president's proposed legislation has made many global leaders sit up and take notice.
See also: and, make, notice, sit, take, up

take a blind bit of notice

To give one's attention to someone or something. Almost always used in the negative to convey the opposite. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I've been trying to show her I fancy her, but she hasn't taken a blind bit of notice. My parents don't take a blind bit of notice of my dreams of becoming a musicians—they just want me to major in business.
See also: bit, blind, notice, of, take

on short notice

Without much warning or time to prepare. Who do you think will be free to watch the dog on such short notice?
See also: notice, on, short

sit up and take notice

To become alert and give one's complete attention to someone or something. Although he's been making music for years, it was his smash hit song last April that caused people to sit up and take notice. The president's proposed legislation has made many global leaders sit up and take notice.
See also: and, notice, sit, take, up

take note

Remember or focus on (something). Take note—this street will be closed on Monday.
See also: note, take

give notice

1. To inform one's employer of one's resignation. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is often used between "give" and "notice." I just gave my notice, so I'm officially leaving in two weeks.
2. To alert one to something. I think your teacher would have been more understanding if you had given notice of this printing issue in advance.
See also: give, notice

at a moment's notice

 and on a moment's notice
with very little advance notice; with just a little bit of warning. They are always asking us to produce reports at a moment's notice.
See also: notice

come to attention

to assume a formal military posture, standing very straight. Almost immediately, the soldiers came to attention.
See also: attention, come

come to someone's attention

 and come to someone's notice
to be told to, revealed to, or discovered by someone. It has come to my attention that you are not following the rules. Your comments have just come to my notice.
See also: attention, come

escape someone's notice

Fig. to go unnoticed; not to have been noticed. (Usually a way to point out that someone has failed to see or respond to something.) I suppose my earlier request escaped your notice, so I'm writing again. I'm sorry. Your letter escaped my notice.
See also: escape, notice

give (one's) notice

to formally tell one's employer that one is quitting one's job. Did you hear that James is leaving? He gave his notice yesterday. Lisa gave notice today. She got a job offer from another company.
See also: give, notice

on short notice

quickly and without a timely notification of other people; with very little lead time. She called the meeting on such short notice that we had no time to prepare.
See also: notice, on, short

serve notice (on someone)

to formally or clearly announce something to someone. John served notice that he wouldn't prepare the coffee anymore. I'm serving notice that I'll resign as secretary next month.
See also: notice, serve

sit up

 
1. to rise from a lying to a sitting position. When the alarm went off, he sat up and put his feet on the floor. She couldn't sleep, so she sat up and read a book.
2. to sit more straight in one's seat; to hold one's posture more upright while seated. Please sit up. Don't slouch! You wouldn't get backaches if you would sit up.
See also: sit, up

sit up and take notice

to become alert and pay attention. A loud noise from the front of the room caused everyone to sit up and take notice. The company wouldn't pay any attention to my complaints. When I had my lawyer write them a letter, they sat up and took notice.
See also: and, notice, sit, take, up

take notice of someone or something

Fig. to notice the presence or existence of someone or something. They didn't take notice of me, so I left. I took notice of the amount of the bill.
See also: notice, of, take

with advance notice

 and on advance notice
with some kind of notification or indication that something is going to happen or is expected before it actually happens. We are happy to provide special meals for anyone with advance notice.
See also: advance, notice

escape notice

Elude attention or observation, as in It must have escaped the editor's notice so I'll write again. [c. 1700]
See also: escape, notice

give notice

1. Inform or warn someone of something, as in He's prompt about giving us notice of any discrepancy in the accounts. [Late 1500s]
2. Tell one's employer one is quitting, as in Our housekeeper gave notice last week. This usage, first recorded in 1765, originally alluded to any kind of termination, such as a housing lease, but today is most often used for leaving employment.
See also: give, notice

short notice, on

Also, at short notice. With little advance warning or time to prepare, as in They told us to be ready to move out on short notice. The noun notice here is used in the sense of "information" or "intelligence." [Late 1700s]
See also: on, short

sit up

1. Rise to a sitting position from lying down, as in The sick child sat up and asked for a drink of water. [Early 1200s]
2. Stay up later than usual, as in The nurse sat up with her all night long. [Mid-1500s]
3. Sit with the spine erect, as in She was always telling the students to sit up. [Early 1700s]
4. Become suddenly alert, as in The students sat up when he brought up the test. The same sense appears in the related sit up and take notice, as in When he mentioned the arrival of a movie star, they all sat up and took notice. [Late 1800s]
See also: sit, up

take note

Also, take notice. Pay attention, as in Take note, not one man here is wearing a tie, or The aide took notice of the boys throwing spitballs and reported them. An antonym is take no notice of, meaning "ignore," as in Take no notice of them and they'll stop teasing you. [Late 1500s] Also see take notes.
See also: note, take

sit up and take notice

If someone sits up and takes notice, they start paying attention to something because they realize it is important or worth noticing. In the last few years the medical world has begun to sit up and take notice of the role diet has to play in health. Pressure groups will need to campaign hard before anyone in power is forced to sit up and take notice.
See also: and, notice, sit, take, up

at short (or a moment's) notice

with little warning or time for preparation.
See also: notice, short

put someone on notice (or serve notice)

warn someone of something about or likely to occur, often in a formal or threatening way.
See also: notice, on, put

sit up (and take notice)

suddenly start paying attention or have your interest aroused. informal
See also: sit, up

not a ˌblind bit of ˈnotice, ˈdifference, etc.

,

not the ˌblindest bit of ˈnotice, ˈdifference, etc.

(British English, spoken) no notice, difference, etc. at all: She didn’t take a blind bit of notice when I asked her to stop. She walked straight past me.
See also: bit, blind, not, of

escape somebody’s ˈnotice

not be noticed by somebody: It may have escaped your notice but I’m very busy right now. Can we talk later?
See also: escape, notice

at (very) short ˈnotice

(also at a moment’s ˈnotice) with very little warning; without much time to prepare: In this job you have to be able to work weekends at short notice.
See also: notice, short

sit up

v.
1. To rise from lying down to a sitting position: The patient sat up for her meal.
2. To sit with the spine erect: The nanny told the children to sit up.
3. To stay up later than the customary bedtime: My parents sat up waiting for me to come home.
4. To become suddenly alert: The students sat up when the teacher mentioned the test.
See also: sit, up

take notice of

To pay attention to.
See also: notice, of, take