nothing ventured, nothing gained


Also found in: Acronyms.

no pain, no gain

Only by facing, dealing with, or subjecting oneself to difficulty or hardship will one truly improve or progress. I know these training sessions are hard work, but you've got to do it if you want to be a contender for the championship. No pain, no gain! The road to becoming a doctor is long, hard, and exhausting, not to mention expensive! But no pain, no gain.
See also: gain, no

nothing ventured, nothing gained

Risks must be taken in order to achieve anything significant or meaningful. A: "I'm thinking of asking my bosses for a raise, but I'm a little bit nervous." B: "Hey, nothing ventured, nothing gained." It was a bit of a shot in the dark taking a job in a different country, but nothing ventured, nothing gained!
See also: gain, nothing

No pain, no gain.

Fig. If you want to improve, you must work so hard that it hurts. (Associated with sports and physical exercise.) Player: I can't do any more push-ups. My muscles hurt. Coach: No pain, no gain. Come on, everybody! Run one more lap! No pain, no gain!
See also: gain, no

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

If you do not take risks, you will never accomplish anything. Bill: Should I ask my boss for a promotion? Jane: Nothing ventured, nothing gained. I think I'll audition for a part in that play. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
See also: gain, nothing

no pain, no gain

Suffering is needed to make progress, as in I've worked for hours on those irregular French verbs, but no pain, no gain. Although this idiom is often associated with athletic coaches who urge athletes to train harder, it dates from the 1500s and was already in John Ray's proverb collection of 1670 as "Without pains, no gains."
See also: gain, no

nothing ventured, nothing gained

One must take risks to achieve something, as in They quit their jobs, packed up, and moved to Wisconsin, saying "nothing ventured, nothing gained." Although this adage has appeared in slightly different form since the late 1300s, it was first recorded in this form only in 1624. For another version, see no pain, no gain.
See also: gain, nothing

no pain, no gain

People say no pain, no gain to mean that you cannot achieve anything without effort or suffering. I exercise every day. No pain, no gain.
See also: gain, no

no pain, no gain

suffering is necessary in order to achieve something.
There has been a proverbial association between pain and gain since at least the late 16th century, and ‘No Paines, no Gaines’ was the title of a 1648 poem by Robert Herrick . The modern form, which dates from the 1980s, probably originated as a slogan used in fitness classes.
1997 American Spectator As the cliché goes, no pain, no gain. In fact, in our confessional age, you can make quite a lot of gains for very little pain.
See also: gain, no

nothing ˌventured, nothing ˈgained

(saying) used to say that you have to take risks if you want to achieve things and be successful: Go on, apply for the job. You know what they say — nothing ventured, nothing gained.
See also: gain, nothing

nothing ventured, nothing gained

If you won’t take a chance you can’t expect to achieve anything. There are two older proverbial forms of this expression, nothing (nought) venture, nothing (nought) have, stated by Chaucer (ca. 1374), and nothing venture, nothing win, stated by William Caxton about a century later. The modern form appears in Thomas Heywood’s play Captives (1624): “I see here that nought venters, nothinge gaynes.” It has been repeated in numerous languages ever since. Another, seemingly modern form is no pain, no gain, today frequently uttered by coaches, trainers, and physical therapists. Versions of this date from the early seventeenth century—“Pain is forgotten where gain follows” appeared in several early proverb collections—and the current rhyming cliché was proverbial by the mid-nineteenth century.
See also: gain, nothing
References in periodicals archive ?
VIRGO (Aug 24-Sept 23) Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
Nothing ventured, nothing gained - if you're willing to take a gamble on smaller, riskier but possibly very rewarding businesses, you can tuck money away tax-free in a venture capital trust (VCT).
Nothing ventured, nothing gained is today's phrase that pays, so where will you use it?
David Ashforth decides to take on Dunguib and Blazing Bailey in his charity joust with the bookmaking fraternity NOTHING ventured, nothing gained.
However, nothing ventured, nothing gained, and Rambling Minster defied his welter burden, travelled like a dream, and was given a peach of a ride by his young jockey whom I had criticised for what I considered was an ill-judged performance on another stable runner the previous Sunday.
NOTHING ventured, nothing gained, was the philosophical reaction of Paul Nicholls to the comprehensive Guinness Gold Cup defeat of Denman, who appeared to hate racing right-handed and could finish only fourth, writes Lee Mottershead.
But, nothing ventured, nothing gained so go for it anyway and revel in compliments lavished on you.
We aren't exactly getting bombarded by players wanting to come and join us, so a gamble on the likes of Trundle would be nothing ventured, nothing gained.
Nothing ventured, nothing gained, so after negotiating the speeding fine lottery that is the A55, we found ourselves 'scoping the Welsh swell in the early morning light as ravens croaked overhead, and rock pipits called from the cliff face beneath us.
But, as they say, nothing ventured, nothing gained, and I'd much rather get stuck into this puzzle than take things leisurely and pull out none of the stops to come up with a short-priced selection in, say, one of the six-runner conditions races at Leicester.
Dear Craig, Nothing ventured, nothing gained but dating your ex-wife's sister will be fraught with complications.
Clive Williams, RPC Wales's secretary, said, "We believe nothing ventured, nothing gained.
It was an approach that could have been more costly but Kidney is a believer in the nothing ventured, nothing gained school of thought.