nothing loath

nothing loath

Not unwilling; unopposed to. Despite having lost a huge sum in his previous venture, the wealthy investor seems nothing loath to try backing yet another startup company with a similar sales pitch. Nothing loath, Ms. Carter took to the dance floor with the charming young man.
See also: nothing

nothing loath

quite willing.
This expression was used by John Milton in Paradise Lost: ‘Her hand he seis'd, and to a shadie bank…He led her nothing loath’.
See also: nothing
References in classic literature ?
The morning's ride had made him hungry; and he was nothing loath when they bade him come to the dinner.
The Minatarees, also, were nothing loath, feeling in some measure committed in hostility to the whites, in consequence of their tribe having killed two white men above the fort of the Missouri Fur Company.
Mr Tappertit, nothing loath, began again; and so the three went staggering on, arm-in-arm, shouting like madmen, and defying the watch with great valour.
The Sagoth prisoners we usually found quite ready to trans-fer their allegiance to us, for they are little more than brutes, and when they found that we could fill their stomachs and give them plenty of fighting, they were nothing loath to march with us against the next Mahar city and battle with men of their own race.
The Earl was careful to keep out of reach of the point of De Conde's sword, and the men-at-arms were nothing loath to emulate their master's example.
cried the little man, pushing Dodson & Fogg, nothing loath, out of the office; 'this way, my dear sirs--now pray don't prolong this-- Dear me--Mr.
Neither of us seemed disposed to resume digging, and when he suggested a meal, I was nothing loath.