not (really) (one's) thing

(redirected from not your thing)

not (really) (one's) thing

Not something one particularly enjoys or is good at. A: "Do you want to come with me to the concert this Saturday?" B: "No thanks, country isn't my thing." I'll give it a try, but car repair isn't really my thing.
See also: not, thing

it isn’t my, his, etc. ˈthing

it is not something that you really enjoy or are interested in: I’m afraid pubs and clubs aren’t really my thing. I’d prefer to go to a restaurant with a few friends.
See also: thing
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Washington [United States], September 26 (ANI): If gaming controllers are not your thing, Xbox One is now allowing support for the more traditional setup of keyboard and mouse.
So she said, "This is not your thing." And I knew it.
The large round tufts of flowers on these native plants are light pink with accents of darker pinkish purple tints, If pink is not your thing, or if your soil is drier, you might try the orange vibrant Butterfly-weed (Asclepias tuberosa), which is also lower growing--about two feet tall.
It also has a cup warmer and if coffee is not your thing can even make you a steaming cup of tea instead.
Britney caps not your thing? You won't have to worry about bad hair Days if you pick up a fall bucket hat!
If skiing's not your thing, Soldier Hollow also offers snowshoeing and a lift-served tubing hill, plus rental equipment.
If Skye's not your thing, then the Scottish Tourist Board have a whole host of great getaways in their Autumn Gold brochure.
Pink not your thing? Use an eyeshadow brush to dust twinkling lemon-y loose eye powder on your lids for a glistening gaze.
If testing your brains out is not your thing, you can still shave off thousands of dollars from the escalating cost of college tuition in other ways: concurrent enrollment in college and high school; correspondence courses and distance learning courses available on audio- and videotapes, online, television and combinations thereof; credit for foreign academic experience; and credit for life experience learning, which is now awarded through most nontraditional or independent study degree programs.