not turn a hair

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not turn a hair

To show no outward emotion when something bad happens or is announced; to maintain a perfectly calm demeanor. I thought he'd be devastated after losing the race, but he didn't turn a hair. You have to give Jane credit. She didn't turn a hair when the customer started shouting in her face. The woman, not turning a hair, paid nearly $30 grand in cash for the diamond-encrusted necklace.
See also: hair, not, turn
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

turn a hair, not

Not become afraid or upset, remain calm, as in She didn't turn a hair during the bank robbery. This term, also put as without turning a hair, comes from horse racing. After a race, a horse often has roughened, outward-turned hair. Its figurative use, nearly always in the negative, dates from the late 1800s.
See also: not, turn
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

not turn a hair

If you do not turn a hair in an unpleasant or difficult situation, you do not show any sign of being afraid or anxious. She started off by accusing him of blackmail but he didn't turn a hair. Tiane dealt with the situation without turning a hair.
See also: hair, not, turn
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

not turn a hair

remain apparently unmoved or unaffected.
See also: hair, not, turn
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

not turn a ˈhair

not show strong emotion like fear, surprise or excitement, when others expect you to: He didn’t turn a hair when the judge gave him a 20-year prison sentence.
See also: hair, not, turn
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

turning a hair, not/without

Showing no sign of agitation or distress; quite unruffled and unafraid. This expression comes from horse-racing, where a horse that is extremely sweaty shows it in the roughening of its hair. It was transferred, but only in the negative, to human sangfroid in the late nineteenth century. Still referring to its origin, Richard D. Blackmore wrote (Dariel, 1897), “She never turned a hair—as the sporting people say.”
See also: not, turning, without
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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