not to put too fine a point on it


Also found in: Acronyms.

not to put too fine a point on it

Not to belabor the point or dwell on a minor detail. Said to excuse oneself for doing exactly that. Not to put too fine a point on it, but that's a granny knot, not a square knot.
See also: fine, not, on, point, put, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

not to put too fine a point on it

Fig. a phrase introducing a fine or important point, apologetically. Rachel: Not to put too fine a point on it, Mary, but you're still acting a little rude to Tom. Mary: I'm sorry, but that's the way I feel. John: I think, not to put too fine a point on it, you ought to do exactly as you are told. Andy: And I think you ought to mind your own business.
See also: fine, not, on, point, put, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

not to put too fine a point on it

BRITISH
You say not to put too fine a point on it in order to show that what you are about to say may sound unpleasant, unkind, or offensive. He is, not to put too fine a point on it, a bit of a bore. Kerry's boyfriend of seven years, not to put too fine a point on it, dumped her just before their wedding.
See also: fine, not, on, point, put, to
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

not to put too fine a point on it

to speak bluntly.
See also: fine, not, on, point, put, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

not to put too fine a ˈpoint on it

used when you are about to speak very directly or honestly: Not to put too fine a point on it, I think you’ve been a complete idiot.
See also: fine, not, on, point, put, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

not to put too fine a point on it

To speak bluntly. This analogy to a cutting tool was particularly favored by Dickens. He used it frequently and on occasion defined it, as in “Not to put too fine a point upon it—a favourite apology for plain-speaking with Mr. Snagsby” (Bleak House, 1852). It may be obsolescent in Britain and obsolete in America.
See also: fine, not, on, point, put, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also: