not so much


Also found in: Acronyms.

not so much

Used immediately after some statement or the name of some person, especially when posed as a question, in order to dismiss their validity, veracity, importance, etc. I agree, taxes are a total pain in the rear end, but is being busted for tax fraud better? Uh, no, not so much. Our candidate has a track record that proves she's the right person for the job. Your candidate? Not so much.
See also: much, not
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

not so much

A dismissal of what goes before. This phrase dates from the early 1990s and is widely used in numerous contexts. It was especially popularized by Jon Stewart on Comedy Central’s “Daily Show.” When asked which Democrat would step out to lead the party, Stewart responded, “I like this guy John Kennedy. Since him, not so much.” A Time headline over a column by Jay Newton-Small about Nevada’s Sharron Angle challenging the Senate majority leader for his seat read, “Harry Reid Looked Beatable This Year. Now? Not So Much” (July 5, 2010). Similarly, a fictional character being offered a bribe said, “You know, a million used to be real money. Not so much these days” (Nevada Barr, Burn, 2010). The phrase is clearly a cliché.
See also: much, not
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
So our myths sing of god the creator, not so much to remind us of our dependence--we learn the lessons of dependency soon enough when hungry and cold and frightened--but because the gods need "creation"; without it, they are unformed, characterless, ultimately empty.
Indeed, most such books had not so much as an index entry on the subject.