not bad

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not bad

Better than average or expected; satisfactory. A: "How's your new schedule this semester?" B: "Not bad. I don't have any classes before 11 AM, so that's a win in my book!" I didn't think I'd like it, but sushi isn't bad!
See also: bad, not

Not bad (at all).

 
1. [Someone or something is] quite satisfactory. Bill: How do you like your new teacher? Jane: Not bad. Bob: Is this pen okay? Bill: I guess. Yeah. Not bad.
2. [Someone or something is] really quite good. (The person or thing can be named, as in the examples.) John: How do you like that new car of yours? Mary: Not bad. Not bad at all. Tom: This one looks great to me. What do you think? Sue: It's not bad.
See also: bad, not

not bad

Also, not half bad; not so or too bad ; not too shabby. Fairly good, as in Not bad, said the conductor, but we need to play the scherzo again, or The movie wasn't half bad, but Jerry wanted to go home, or Our garden's not too bad this year, or How are things going?-Not too shabby. All of the terms involving bad, which imply that something is less bad than it might be, date from the mid-1700s. The last variant, using shabby in the sense of "inferior," is slang of the late 1900s.
See also: bad, not

not (so/too) ˈbad

(spoken) quite good: ‘How are you feeling today?’ ‘Not too bad, thanks.’Some of his recent books are really not bad.
See also: bad, not
References in classic literature ?
But this is not so. I speak rather because I am convinced that I never intentionally wronged any one, although I cannot convince you--the time has been too short; if there were a law at Athens, as there is in other cities, that a capital cause should not be decided in one day, then I believe that I should have convinced you.
Not so; the deficiency which led to my conviction was not of words-- certainly not.
Not so, Socrates, if you will take our advice; do not make yourself ridiculous by escaping out of the city.
It was not so with Chaucer, whom I loved from the first word of his which I found quoted in those lectures, and in Chambers's 'Encyclopaedia of English Literature,' which I had borrowed of my friend the organ-builder.
I began to employ in my own work the archaic words that I fancied most, which was futile and foolish enough, and I formed a preference for the simpler Anglo-Saxon woof of our speech, which was not so bad.
And the end or use of a horse or of anything would be that which could not be accomplished, or not so well accomplished, by any other thing?
And yet not so well as with a pruning-hook made for the purpose?
Then now I think you will have no difficulty in understanding my meaning when I asked the question whether the end of anything would be that which could not be accomplished, or not so well accomplished, by any other thing?
It is very true that, after acquiring rebellious provinces a second time, they are not so lightly lost afterwards, because the prince, with little reluctance, takes the opportunity of the rebellion to punish the delinquents, to clear out the suspects, and to strengthen himself in the weakest places.
Thus speaketh one Ferdinand in the words of the play -- "She died full young" -- one Bossola answers him -- "I think not so -- her infelicity "Seemed to have years too many" -- Ah luckless lady!
Was it not so? We differed in opinion touching him.
It is not so important that many should be good as you, as that there be some absolute goodness somewhere; for that will leaven the whole lump.
"To be sure," said Harriet, in a mortified voice, "he is not so genteel as real gentlemen."
This lack of confession of guilt in the lament psalms and the laments of Jeremiah as well as the protestations of innocence (e.g., Jer 15:15-18; Pss 17,26) are not so shocking if we remember that these laments have to do with some specific occurrence (e.g., being oppressed unjustly).