not pull (one's) punches

(redirected from not pull punches)

not pull (one's) punches

1. To actually punch someone, when one was supposed to pretend to. I want to make the scene realistic, so don't pull your punches next time!
2. By extension, to not restrict or constrain one's commentary or criticism of someone or something, to the point or being potentially offensive or tactless. I want your honest opinion of my story—don't pull your punches! Wow, your aunt really doesn't pull her punches. Is my sweatshirt really that ugly?
See also: not, pull, punch

not pull your punches

or

pull no punches

COMMON If someone does not pull their punches or pulls no punches, they state facts or opinions directly, without trying not to upset people. He had never lied to me in the past and he didn't pull his punches now. He told me that in his opinion, Robin would be dead in nine months. He pulls no punches in his attacks on the government's foreign policy. Note: If boxers pull their punches, they do not hit their opponent as hard as they could do.
See also: not, pull, punch
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Minister Sajjan did not pull punches in his CANSEC remarks, suggesting Boeing was not behaving as a "trusted partner" because of the U.
Earlier, the White House, announcing Obama's attendance in the Asean Summit, said that the American leader will not pull punches in raising human rights issue in a meeting with Duterte.
That visibility has brought attacks from the current front-runner, Trump, who tends to not pull punches when it comes to his presidential competition.
Writer and activist Jane Jacobs did not pull punches.
Scrum coach Rowntree does not plan on repeating Jim Telfer's notoriously brutal scrummaging session from the 1997 Lions tour but he will not pull punches in his analysis this week.
Financial Armageddon does not pull punches in its warnings of doom and gloom, and what raw economic realities can potentially inflict upon Americans everywhere, yet its greatest asset is its solidly practical advice for preparing for the worst.
Unlike the authors of some of the competing academic histories, Romerstein and Breindel do not pull punches by trying to be nonjudgmental--a major plus, since it really shouldn't hurt one's credibility to take a position against treason.
The author does not pull punches where necessary, and in consequence has produced a history that is supported by a comprehensive review not just of events, but of factors responsible for them.