not much chop

not much chop

Not as good as what was expected, required, or demanded; not satisfactory or adequate. Primarily heard in Australia, Canada. Jim, I know you've had a lot on your plate, but these reports just aren't much chop. I used to eat there all the time, but to be honest their food hasn't been much chop recently.
See also: chop, much, not

not much chop

AUSTRALIAN, INFORMAL
If something or someone is not much chop, they are not very good at something or are of poor quality. The horses he beat were not much chop. My husband's not much chop when it comes to sharing the housework. Note: The usual British expression is not much cop.
See also: chop, much, not

not much chop

no good; not up to much. Australian & New Zealand informal
The sense of chop in this expression originated in the Hindi word chap meaning ‘official stamp’. Europeans in the Far East extended the use of the word to cover documents such as passports to which an official stamp or impression was attached and in China it came to mean ‘branded goods’. From this, in the late 19th century, chop was used to refer to something that had ‘class’ or had been validated as genuine or good.
1947 Dan Davin The Gorse Blooms Pale I know it's not been much chop so far but we're only getting started.
See also: chop, much, not

not much ˈchop

(AustralE, New Zealand, informal) not very good or useful: The movie’s not much chop.I’ve baked a few cakes, but I’m not much chop in the kitchen.This comes from a Hindi word for an official seal. It was used in China and other Asian countries to refer to goods of a certain quality and from this came to mean ‘good quality’ in general.
See also: chop, much, not