not go amiss

not go amiss

To be helpful and appreciated. An extra pair of hands in the kitchen would not go amiss, you know.
See also: amiss, not

not come/go aˈmiss

(British English) be useful or pleasant in a particular situation: A little luck wouldn’t go amiss right now!
See also: amiss, come, not
References in periodicals archive ?
An apology from Mr President to the African continent and a retraction of the said vulgar statement will not go amiss.
A little training would not go amiss if councillors are unable to read plans.
This being the case, a substantial reduction in council tax would not go amiss.
Henderson's charge battled back over an extended two miles and eventually triumphed by upwards of four lengths, suggesting in the process that a step-up in trip would not go amiss.
Perhaps a little advertising would not go amiss as there may be many people in Huddersfield and district who are unaware of its existence.
Wayne Rooney may be struggling for his best form, but I reckon a bit of competition would not go amiss - like a marquee signing.
Wayne Rooney is struggling for his best form and a bit of competition would not go amiss for the frontman role - like a marquee signing.
Teacher development programmes, regular parent workshops and weekly personal and social education classes time-tabled into the school curriculum would not go amiss.
A drop of rain between now and the weekend would not go amiss for the colt, who showed plenty of toe over five furlongs and is a 16-1 chance for the Qipco 2,000 Guineas.
Please take your litter home" signs or signs with stronger wording would not go amiss.
A weekly visit and walkabout by Liam Byrne, Hodge Hill MP, would not go amiss.
Something a bit more respectful would not go amiss.
A few words of warning from Mum might not go amiss.
A hostess would not go amiss, either - perhaps these could act as a relief driver?
At very least some respect for young people - the future of the city, would not go amiss.