noodge


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nudge

1. noun Someone who is constantly or persistently pestering, badgering, or irritating someone, especially with complaints or criticisms. God, you've been such a nudge lately. You need to lighten up! He turned into a real nudge as we got closer to the deadline.
2. verb To complain or criticize in a constant, irritating manner. Instead of just nudging the whole time, why no actually try to help us get this done? If you're going to nudge the whole drive, I'll just turn this car around and take all of us home.
3. verb To pester, badger, or irritate someone constantly or persistently, especially with complaints or criticisms. I wish you would stop nudging me about the project—I already told you I had everything under control! I wish she wouldn't nudge me like that. I'll do the dishes in due time!

noodge

1. noun Someone who is constantly or persistently pestering, badgering, or irritating someone, especially with complaints or criticisms. God, you've been such a noodge lately. You need to lighten up! He turned into a real noodge as we got closer to the deadline.
2. verb To complain or criticize in a constant, irritating manner. Instead of just noodging the whole time, why no actually try to help us get this done? If you're going to noodge the whole drive, I'll just turn this car around and take all of us home.
3. verb To pester, badger, or irritate someone constantly or persistently, especially with complaints or criticisms. I wish you would stop noodging me about the project—I already told you I had everything under control! I wish she wouldn't noodge me like that. I'll do the dishes in due time!

nudge

and noodge (nʊdʒ)
1. n. someone who nags. Sally can be such a nudge!
2. in. to nag. Don’t noodge all the time.
3. tv. to nag someone. Stop nudging me about that.

noodge

verb
See nudge
References in periodicals archive ?
My first noodge is to ask whether the emphasis is on the adjective-- libertarian paternalism--or on the noun--libertarian paternalism.
But there are a few characters in the stories that Yale tells (and if you noodge him enough, retells) who never emerge entirely unscathed.
(Safire has also taken glee in pointing out the difference between nudge and the Yiddish noodge, or to "push" versus to "pester," but surely one nudges people because one is a noodge.)
The Singaporean "Ng" family, for example, is subject to a variety of pronunciations, ranging from "gong" to the Yiddish-inspired "noodge." Number One confidently presented "Ing."
Though oysgegrinte did not survive, such is not the case for shlemiel, shlemazl, yente, klutz, shmendrik, krechtser, kibitzer, kvetsh, noodge, nudnik, shleper, nokhshleper, khokhm, knaker, and gantser knaker, just to name a few human types whose Yiddish name tags are not unfamiliar to us.