none other than

none other than

A phrase used to indicate that the person being identified is unexpected but recognizable or familiar. Often used in describing a coincidental encounter. The mystery assailant turned out to be none other than my old roommate. The president has chosen none other than his brother as his new chief of staff.
See also: none, other

none other than

Cliché the very [person]. (Expresses surprise.) The new building was opened by none other than the president. Bob's wife turned out to be none other than my cousin.
See also: none, other

none other than

That very person or thing, the same as. For example, In the elevator I ran into none other than the woman we'd been talking about, or It turned out to be none other than Jim in a clown costume. [Late 1800s]
See also: none, other

none ˈother than somebody

used to emphasize who or what somebody/something is, when this is surprising: And who do you think was responsible for the mistake? None other than the director himself!
See also: none, other, somebody
References in classic literature ?
He saw him in the trees in greater numbers than he ever had seen Histah before; and once beside a reedy pool he caught a scent that could have belonged to none other than Gimla the crocodile, but upon none of these did the Tarmangani care to feed.
His heart leapt to his mouth, for this was none other than the great Brigham Young himself.
Facing Confucius across the lobby none other is none other than a statue of Sir Isaac Newton.
Save God himself, none other than a husband and a wife can truly evaluate whether what life requires of them can still be fulfilled with the birth of a new child.