non compos (mentis)

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non compos (mentis)

Not sane or mentally competent. The phrase is Latin for "not of sound mind." Based on the orders he's been giving lately, many believe him to be non compos. The judge ruled that she had been non compos mentis at the time, and thus could not be held legally liable.
See also: compo, non

non compos

(ˈnɑn ˈkɑmpos)
1. mod. out of one’s mind; non compos mentis. She is strictly non compos!
2. and non compos poopoo mod. alcohol intoxicated. That gal isn’t just drunk. She’s non compos poopoo.
See also: compo, non

non compos

Crazy; mentally incapacitated and therefore unable to be responsible for one’s speech or actions. This term is an abbreviation of the Latin non compos mentis, literally translated as “not master of one’s mind,” or “not of sound mind.” It dates from the seventeenth century and today is loosely used for irrational behavior, as well as surviving in legal terminology.
See also: compo, non
References in periodicals archive ?
The power of language can categorize and then lock up people through labels, consigning them in perpetuity to be depicted in medieval or early modern administrative records as forever idiota or non compos mentis. We can only glimpse what those individuals' actual experience was like, and in that sense we are locked out of their experience and confined to our current knowledge through the piecemeal records that substitute for the bodies of actual, once-living persons.
II (1385), as was asked of Lucy atte Brigge who 'is an idiot' but was examined as to whether she was non compos mentis and if she had 'lucid intervals'.
An idiot, according to the Act, was "any person to be naturally wanting of understanding, so as to be uncapable to provide for him or herself." A distracted person, by contrast, was anyone who "by the Providence of God, shall fall into distraction, and become Non compos mentis." To colonists, then, distraction was a mental disability with possibly temporary effects; it was likely to occur later in life and it could be seriously debilitating, while idiocy was life-long and permanent, a condition of mental inferior ity with material consequences.
(21.) John Brydall, Non Compos Mentis: Or, the Law Relating to Natural Fools, Mad-Folks, and Lunatick Persons, Inquisited, and Explained, for Common Benefit (London, 1700), p.
Hi I'm a 23-year-old non compos mentis male and I'm looking for male and female pen-pals for deep chaotic poetry and interesting letters.