no-good

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no good

1. adjective Worthless; futile; no use. I'm telling you, it's no good complaining to a receptionist—you need to get a manager on the line.
2. adjective Poor or unsatisfactory in quality. I'm sorry to be blunt, but your writing is no good.
3. adjective Having no positive characteristics. Always hyphenated and used before a noun. That no-good brother of hers ran off with the money.
4. adjective Unfortunate; pitiable. A: "Unfortunately, John is sick with the flu." B: "Oh, that's no good. Tell him I hope he feels better."
5. noun Nothing worthwhile or useful. You can yell all you want, but it will do no good.
6. noun Malicious, harmful, or mischievous activity. What are you boys whispering about? You're up to no good, aren't you?
7. noun A negative or harmful outcome. You'll come to no good if you don't go to a doctor soon.
8. expression That is not what is needed; that will not work. A: "We have confectioner's sugar, will that work?" B: "No good. We need granulated sugar."
See also: good, no

no-good

1. n. a worthless person. Tell that no-good to leave.
2. mod. worthless; bad. I have never heard of such a no-good car dealership before.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leading the voices of disapproval is Na's brother Wit (Dul Yaambunying), who heads a gang of motorbike-riding no-goods and calmly tells his sister he's a hopeless ease for reform.
Some groups of thieving no-goods have been borrowing each others' kids in order to increase their claim for the state benefit.
What I did disagree with was ET's linking of no-goods with football and Peter Brown's suggestion that football addiction is worse than drug addiction.
Some people who go to football are probably, as ET calls, them "no-goods" but I "have no reason to doubt" some no-goods do not go to football.
The performer, who underwent chemotherapy and radiation for a rare form of lymphoma, feels he has the disease as beat as one of the no-goods he used to whup on prime time - and that he came away from his brush with death having gained valuable insights.
Theodore Witcher's expletive-heavy screenplay opens with four no-goods fleeing a bungled art museum robbery in Boston.