no way


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no way

1. No possible method or chance (that something will happen). There is no way I'm going to pass this class. Why should I even try? No way will he beat me one-on-one. Just no way.
2. Absolutely not; no chance. A: "Billy, please unload the dishwasher for me." B: "No way! It's Janet's turn."
3. An expression of surprise in response to a positive occurrence, perhaps one that was thought to be unlikely. A: "Jim got an A on his final exam!" B: "No way! That's great news!
See also: no, way

No way!

Inf. No! Me join the Army? No way! She can't do that. No way!
See also: no

no way

Also, there is no way. Certainly not; never. For example, No way can I forget what he did, or Are you coming along?-No way! or There's no way our candidate can lose. This colloquial expression dates from the mid-1900s, but an earlier adverb, noway, dates from the 1300s.
See also: no, way

no way

INFORMAL
COMMON You can say no way as an emphatic way of saying no. Mike, no way am I playing cards with you for money. That was not the life Jack Hewitt planned to live. No way!
See also: no, way

no way

under no circumstances; not at all. informal
See also: no, way

ˌno ˈway

(informal) definitely not; never: ‘Are you going to stay at school after you’re 16?’ ‘No way. I want to get a job.’No way am I going to speak to him again!
See also: no, way

No way!

exclam. No! (Compare this with Way!) She can’t do that. No way!
See also: no

no way

Informal
Certainly not: Did you like that movie?—No way! It was boring.
See also: no, way

no way

Under no circumstances. This relatively new assertion of impossibility dates from the 1960s and is American in origin. Slangy in tone, it has several variations: the rhyming no way, José and the enumerative in no way, shape, or form. (See also in any way, shape, or form). J. G. Vermandel used it in Dine with the Devil (1970): “No way can I do it any faster than that.”
See also: no, way