long time no see

(redirected from no see)

long time

A lengthy amount of time. We've been waiting here for a long time. When will we be seated? Oh, I've known Holly for a long time—since grade school, in fact!
See also: long, time

long time no see

A phrase used when one encounters someone after having not seen them for a long period of time. Hey, Al, long time no see! How have you been?
See also: long, no, see, time

Long time no see.

Cliché I have not seen you in a long time.; We have not seen each other in a long time. Tom: Hi, Fred. Where have you been keeping yourself? Fred: Good to see you, Tom. Long time no see. John: It's Bob! Hi, Bob! Bob: Hi, John! Long time no see.
See also: long, no, see, time

long time no see

It's been a long time since we met, as in Hi Bob! Long time no see. This jocular imitation of broken English originated in the pidgin English used in Chinese and Western exchange. [Late 1800s]
See also: long, no, see, time

long time no see

COMMON People say long time no see to someone that they have not seen for a long time. She raced in and said, `Hi, Dick, long time no see!'
See also: long, no, see, time

long time no see

it's a long time since we last met (used as a greeting). informal
This idiom developed as a humorous imitation of broken English spoken by a Native American.
See also: long, no, see, time

long time no ˈsee

(spoken) used when you greet somebody you have not seen for a long time: Well, hello! Long time no see.
See also: long, no, see, time

Long time no see

phr. I haven’t seen you in a long time. Hey, John! Long time no see!
See also: long, no, see, time

long time no see

I haven’t seen you for ages, usually used as an informal greeting. This expression originated in the pidgin English used by the Chinese and Westerners dealing with them in the late nineteenth century, which gave rise to other simplified locutions such as “No can do.” This particular phrase is a translation of an actual Chinese greeting, ch’ang chih mei (or hao jiu mei jian). Heard very often until the mid-twentieth century, with its provenance long forgotten, this cliché may be obsolescent.
See also: long, no, see, time