no offence

no offense

What I have said or am about to say is not meant to offend or insult you, even though it could be interpreted that way. No offense, but I think it may be time you cleaned up your kitchen. All I'm saying is that I think we could use some more help with the renovation. No offense, John, you've been a big help.
See also: no, offense

no ofˈfence

(spoken) used to say that you do not mean to upset or insult somebody by something you say or do: No offence, but I’d really like to be on my own.
See also: no, offence
References in classic literature ?
When he had done laughing, he said to Don Quixote, "You have replied on your own behalf so stoutly, Sir Knight of the Lions, that there is no occasion to seek further satisfaction for this, which, though it may look like an offence, is not so at all, for, as women can give no offence, no more can ecclesiastics, as you very well know.
No Offence Channel 4, 9pm Do we really need another new police drama?
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