nitpicker


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nitpicker

Someone who is overly inclined to point out or complain about every flaw they come across (in or about something), no matter how small, petty, or insignificant. Sometimes hyphenated or spelled as two separate words. You might write me off as just a nitpicker, but you'll appreciate it when you get an A+ on this paper. This is why I hate going to the movies with nit-pickers like you. Instead of just enjoying what we watch, you have to criticize every little flaw you can think of!
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

nit-picker

n. a person who is hypercritical. Mary is such a nit-picker!
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

nitpicker

Someone who bothers with tiny, trivial, unimportant details, in effect looking for mistakes. “Nit” alludes to the tiny eggs of the louse. The term dates from the mid-1900s.
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
What is the shortest route for Arthur to walk in order to ask Mr Nitpicker for a hall pass?
"As a copy editor, I appreciate the occasional funny head, but that's not what I strive for--especially not the obvious pun," says Renee, a "self-professed grammar and usage nitpicker."
The nitpicker might suggest that eternal themes are a shaky basis on which to establish the influence of a particular legend on a text.
"I'm the nitpicker, making sure the bolts all match." They were able to save the engine block and the head.
Bellows, fortunately, has the ego of an impresario, not a nitpicker. Says Jimmy Breslin, a writer Bellows unleashed: "He would praise and then fight for anything he liked.
It ends: "We lack perception - / Words are needed; or / what answer is appropriate / if one asks where / the fist went / when the palm opened?" A nitpicker for logic (a very unpoetic trait), I said to myself, "But a palm can't open; a palm is flat.
A caveat: Staff members must view the wanderer as a resource person and helper, not a nitpicker looking over their shoulders for something to criticize.
He is a needy little nitpicker, desperately trying to raise his profile by acting like a pantomime villain.
Now call me a nitpicker, but this is a film that doesn't make any sense.
That sounded pretty good, until some nitpicker later pointed out what happens to grape prices when production doubles?
That said, if you're not a nitpicker, audio quality will be easily up to acceptable standards.
"I don't like to be a nitpicker," says Doughty, "but this cord is my lifeline.
Chaput's supporters regard him as a staunch champion of orthodoxy; his critics as a relentless nitpicker who often bogs down conference discussions in minutiae.
Ad-libbing to the hilt, DJ made the mistake of joking about the 'advanced' age of Accomplished Nitpicker.
But to the trained forensic mind the whole problem would seem relatively simple, revolving as it does around the vexed question of who holds the rights to a jockey's outer garments (the matter of jurisdiction over his or her underwear is not at present in dispute, and woe betide any legalistic nitpicker who dares to try to widen the argument, as it were, to include these items whose essentially personal and non-controversial nature have been enshrined in British law since the important precedent of noli me tangere set in the groundbreaking case of Wilkins v Webfoot [Court of Petty Sessions, July 1628]).