nip and tuck


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nip and tuck

1. noun A cosmetic surgery procedure, often (but not always) one performed on the face. Many women consider getting a nip and tuck as they age, but I think my wrinkles make me look distinguished.
2. noun A minor change to improve something, often the appearance of something. The house just needs a little nip and tuck before it is ready to go up for sale.
3. adjective Of a contest or competition, having a very close margin between the competitors. This race has been nip and tuck, and we won't know who has won until the final vote is counted.
4. adverb Very closely competing; head-to-head. The two teams went nip and tuck down to the final seconds of the game.
See also: and, nip, tuck

nip and tuck

Fig. almost even; almost tied. The horses ran nip and tuck for the first half of the race. Then my horse pulled ahead. In the football game last Saturday, both teams were nip and tuck throughout the game.
See also: and, nip, tuck

nip and tuck

Very close so that the advantage or lead of competitors keeps shifting, as in It was nip and tuck whether they would deal with the bill before Congress adjourned. The precise allusion in this term has been lost. [Early 1800s] Also see neck and neck.
See also: and, nip, tuck

nip and tuck

INFORMAL
In a competition or contest, if it is nip and tuck, it is impossible to say who will win because both sides are performing equally well. It was nip and tuck throughout as the players struck the ball with equal passion. It was nip-and-tuck from start to finish. Note: One explanation for this expression is that it comes from sword-fighting, where a `nip' is a light touch and a `tuck' a heavier blow. Another is that it comes from horse racing, where it means the same as `neck and neck'.
See also: and, nip, tuck

nip and tuck

very closely contested; neck and neck.
The phrase, which emerged in the US in the 19th century, probably came from the field of sewing or tailoring.
2002 Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society The rough and tumble Senate race is generally regarded as nip and tuck, likely to be decided by a close margin
See also: and, nip, tuck

nip and tuck

mod. so close as to be almost the same; neck and neck. They ran nip and tuck all the way to the finish line, but Tom won the race.
See also: and, nip, tuck

nip and tuck

A very close contest. The ultimate source of this phrase has been lost, but it appears to have originated in nineteenth-century America. An early example is, “It will be like the old bitch and the rabbit, nip and tack [sic] every jump” (Quarter Race in Kentucky, 1836). It is used in the same way as neck and neck.
See also: and, nip, tuck
References in periodicals archive ?
It took most of the summer to get Nip and Tuck to wear a yoke and pull a tire.
Five months full of pulling kids and tires through the deep snow drifts of a New York winter left Nip and Tuck in good shape by spring.
When you see a celeb mum emerging from hospital with a flat tum, you can't help wondering if she's had a nip and tuck as well as a nipper.
She said pop guru Louis Walsh, 56, had agreed they would get a nip and tuck together from Sharon Osbourne's surgeon.
It was nip and tuck at Sheffield's Crucible Theatre all night but it was Williams who held his nerve to claims his second world crown.
It was nip and tuck on the resumption of play as both teams exchanged points to leave three points between the sides with 51 minutes played.
PANTO queen Twink is set to go under the knife for a nip and tuck.
THIS was a nip and tuck game from the kick-off with both teams playing very tight at the back resulting in few chances around goal.
It's still nip and tuck in the Dr Martens Premier as FOREST GREEN won 2-1 at Tamworth to join MERTHYR at the top.