nick

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full of Old Nick

Apt to get into trouble. ("Old Nick" is an old-fashioned name for the devil in Christianity.) Of course the kids got into the paint when they weren't supposed to—they were full of Old Nick today.
See also: full, nick, of, old

full of the devil

Apt to get into trouble. Of course the kids got into the paint when they weren't supposed to—they were full of the devil today.
See also: devil, full, of

in good/poor/etc. nick

In a certain condition, as specified by the adjective used before "nick." Can be used to refer to the physical condition of something or to someone's health. Primarily heard in UK. Our local football club has struggled in the last few years. We don't get many new players, and our pitch has been in poor nick for as long as I can remember. He had a long road to recovery after the surgery, but he's in good nick now.
See also: good, nick, poor

in the nick of time

At the last possible moment before a deadline or before something begins or ends; just in time. That car moved off the track in the nick of time—another moment and the train would have smashed into it. You got here in the nick of time—we're just about to start the show.
See also: nick, of, time

in the very nick of time

At the last possible moment before a deadline or before something begins or ends; just in time. That car moved off the track in the very nick of time—another moment and the train would have smashed into it. You got here in the very nick of time—we're just about to start the show.
See also: nick, of, time, very

just in the nick of time

At the last possible moment before a deadline or before something begins or ends; just in time. That car moved off the track just in the nick of time—another moment and the train would have smashed into it. A: "Sorry I'm late!" B: "Just in the nick of time, Tom. We're just about to start the show now."
See also: just, nick, of, time

knick-knack

A trinket or bauble, typically one that is small and ornamental. I loved visiting my grandmother when I was a child and examining all the various knick-knacks she'd collected around the house.

nick

1. To steal something, especially without the other person noticing. I managed to nick $20 out of my mom's purse, so let's go to the movies or something. I was just a dumb punk when I was in high school, skipping classes and nicking food from convenience stores.
2. To arrest someone. Often used in passive constructions. I heard the cops nicked Tom last night. I got nicked hotwiring a car behind the city courthouse. What are you in for?

nick (one) for (something)

To cheat or swindle one out of something, especially money. The crooked mayor reportedly nicked taxpayers for nearly $1 million during his time in public office. Because they have a near-monopoly in the concert distribution market, the company is able to nick customers for all sorts of bogus extra charges that they add in at the last second.
See also: for, nick

nick ninny

obsolete A foolish or simple-minded person. I don't care if Reginald is in love with her—Edith is an utter nick ninny and, as such, has no place in this celebrated family.
See also: nick, ninny

nick off

1. To leave or depart very suddenly, abruptly, or hurriedly, especially without permission. Primarily heard in Australia. She and two other kids had nicked off from school. The man I had asked to cover for me apparently nicked off early, which meant that I got in trouble for leaving the post unattended.
2. To steal or filch something from someone. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "nick" and "off." Primarily heard in UK. I nicked a cigarette off my roommate and headed outside. Check out this wallet I nicked off a tourist in the city centre.
See also: nick, off

nick up

To scuff, scratch, cut, or dent in multiple places the surface of something, especially one that had previously been free of blemishes. A noun or pronoun can be used between "nick" and "up." The movers I hired didn't put down protective padding and nicked up the top of my oak dressing table. Sarah has been nicking the side of my car up driving too close to the bushes next to the driveway when she backs out in the morning. I needed to shave on the flight, but the turbulence kept making me nick my neck up.
See also: nick, up

Old Nick

An old-fashioned name for the devil in Christianity. Primarily heard in UK. After dating a vegetarian for six months, I would sell my soul to Old Nick for a big, juicy steak right about now.
See also: nick, old
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

full of the devil

 and full of Old Nick
always making mischief. Little Chuckie is sure full of the devil. Toward the end of the school year, the kids are always full of Old Nick.
See also: devil, full, of

*in the (very) nick of time

Fig. just in time; at the last possible instant; just before it's too late. (*Typically: arrive ~; get there ~; happen ~; reach something ~; Save someone ~.) The doctor arrived in the nick of time. The patient's life was saved. I reached the airport in the very nick of time and made my flight.
See also: nick, of, time

nick something up

to make little dents or nicks in something, ruining the finish. Someone nicked the kitchen counter up. Who nicked up the coffeepot?
See also: nick, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in the nick of time

Also, just in time. At the last moment, as in The police arrived in the nick of time, or He got there just in time for dinner. The first term began life as in the nick and dates from the 1500s, when nick meant "the critical moment" (a meaning now obsolete). The second employs just in the sense of "precisely" or "closely," a usage applied to time since the 1500s. Also see in time, def. 1.
See also: nick, of, time
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in the nick of time

COMMON If something happens in the nick of time, it happens at the last possible moment, when it is almost too late. She woke up just in the nick of time and raised the alarm. They got to the hospital in the nick of time, just as the baby was about to be born.
See also: nick, of, time
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

in — nick

in a specified condition. British informal
1997 Ian Rankin Black & Blue Don't be fooled by the wheezing old pensioner routine. Eve's around fifty, still in good nick.
See also: nick

in the nick of time

only just in time; just at the critical moment.
Nick is used here in the sense of ‘the precise moment of an occurrence or an event’. This form of the phrase dates from the mid 17th century, but in the (very ) nick is recorded from the late 16th century.
1985 Nini Herman My Kleinian Home Time and again, when all seemed lost, I somehow won through in the nick of time.
See also: nick, of, time

nick someone for

cheat someone out of something, typically a sum of money. North American informal
1962 Washington Daily News Taxpayers… have heard rumblings that they might be nicked for about a million dollars each year to subsidize professional sports here.
See also: for, nick, someone
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

in good, bad, etc. ˈnick

(British English, informal) in good/bad condition or health: When I last saw him he looked in pretty good nick.She wants to sell the bike, but she won’t get very much for it because it’s in terrible nick.
See also: nick

in the ˌnick of ˈtime

(informal) at the last possible moment; just in time: He got to the railway station in the nick of time.He remembered in the nick of time that his passport was in his coat pocket.
See also: nick, of, time
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

full of the devil

and full of Old Nick
mod. always making mischief. Little Chucky is sure full of the devil. All those kids are full of Old Nick.
See also: devil, full, of

full of Old Nick

verb
See also: full, nick, of, old

nick

1. tv. to arrest someone. (see also nicked.) The cops nicked Paul outside his house.
2. tv. to steal something. The thugs nicked a couple of apples from the fruit stand.
3. tv. to get or take something. Tom nicked a copy of the test for Sam, who also needed one.
4. n. nicotine. I’m craving some nick.

nicked

mod. arrested. “Now I’m nicked,” he said.
See also: nick
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

full of the devil

Very energetic, mischievous, daring, or clever.
See also: devil, full, of

in the nick of time

Just at the critical moment; just in time.
See also: nick, of, time
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nick of time, (just) in the

At the last minute, just in time. This term comes from a now obsolete meaning of nick, that is, “the critical moment.” A 1577 chronicle states, “The Romane navie . . . arrived at the very pinch, or as commonly we say, in the nicke.” Nearly a century later of time was added to clarify the issue, although just in the nick continued to be used for many years. It probably was a cliché by the time Sir Walter Scott wrote (The Pirate, 1821), “The fortunate arrival of Gordaunt, in the very nick of time.”
See also: nick, of
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Nicks worked as a waitress and house cleaner while Buckingham slept late and practiced guitar.
Buckingham may have been zonked out, but in 1975 Mick Fleetwood asked him and Nicks to join his band.
Without such knowledge, readers may not be able to follow the subtle depiction of Nick's mental condition until his fragile hold on rationality dissolves in a burst of stream-of-conscious dialogue and thoughts out of which he suddenly realizes the key to his nightmare images.
Whether it's instinctually and/or unconsciously, Nicks is a believer of forbidden, outrageous love affairs, as evidenced with "For What It's Worth." In the combination mantra/confession of guilt, Nicks declares, "I got to sing.
Nicks, a 28-year professional forester who helped draft the report, says the government's initial response "doesn't address industry's needs head on.
In 1944, after Nicks had spent a year and a half as a premed student at Howard University, his sister Sophie--and a bit of "karma"--recruited him into Cleveland's Karamu Dance Company.
Nicks says the position was created as a result of three commitments that Domtar made to achieve a higher level of sustainable forest management.
"Both pairs told me they were splitting up and that Todd and Jenni would be skating together," says Nicks, who was himself a world pairs champion in 1953.
After their date, Nick and the group date ladies get ready for a rather unusual outing.
"It seems a little bit weird that she's here," Nick can be heard saying (via (http://people.com/tv/the-bachelor-nick-viall-tears-kissing-dancing-promo/) People ).
"Now I Lay Me" is central to our understanding of Nick; its narrative voice constitutes a consciousness that embraces and comments upon the three periods of Nick's life, illuminating the internal territory of disturbing, early memories.
Nick Viall is just about ready to embark on yet another journey toward finding love on Season 21 of "(http://www.ibtimes.com/bachelor-season-21-chris-harrison-reveals-real-reason-luke-pell-wasnt-chosen-abc-2416770) The Bachelor ."
Nick Viall is going to be faced with a lot of (http://www.ibtimes.com/bachelor-paradise-season-3-spoilers-who-got-engaged-finale-shocking-ending-nick-viall-2412153) tough decisions during Season 21 of "(http://www.ibtimes.com/bachelor-season-21-frontrunners-luke-pell-chase-mcnary-react-nick-viall-casting-2409793) The Bachelor " - which girls will he keep, which will he send home and how will he face a previous one-night-stand, for example.
Iggy is officially dating Los Angeles Lakers star player Nick Young, but not everyone knows how the two love birds actually met.