nick

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knick-knack

Any miscellaneous trinket or toy, especially one that is delicate or dainty. I loved visiting my grandmother when I was a child and examining all the various knick-knacks she'd collected around the house.

Old Nick

An old-fashioned name for the devil in Christianity. Primarily heard in UK. After dating a vegetarian for six months, I would sell my soul to Old Nick for a big, juicy steak right about now.
See also: nick, old

in the nick of time

At the last possible moment before a deadline or before something begins or ends; just in time. That car moved off the track in the nick of time—another moment and the train would have smashed into it. You got here in the nick of time—we're just about to start the show.
See also: nick, of, time

in (good, poor, etc.) nick

In a certain condition, as specified by the adjective used before "nick." Can be used to refer to the physical condition of something or to someone's health. Primarily heard in UK. Our local football club has struggled in the last few years. We don't get many new players, and our pitch has been in poor nick for as long as I can remember. He had a long road to recovery after the surgery, but he's in good nick now.
See also: nick

nick (one) for (something)

To cheat or swindle someone out of something, especially money. The crooked mayor reportedly nicked taxpayers for nearly $1 million during his time in public office. Because they have a near-monopoly in the concert distribution market, the company is able to nick customers for all sorts of bogus extra charges that they add in at the last second.
See also: nick

full of the devil

Apt to get into trouble. Of course the kids got into the paint when they weren't supposed to—they were full of the devil today.
See also: devil, full, of

full of Old Nick

Apt to get into trouble. ("Old Nick" is an old-fashioned name for the devil in Christianity.) Of course the kids got into the paint when they weren't supposed to—they were full of Old Nick today.
See also: full, nick, of, old

full of the devil

 and full of Old Nick
always making mischief. Little Chuckie is sure full of the devil. Toward the end of the school year, the kids are always full of Old Nick.
See also: devil, full, of

*in the (very) nick of time

Fig. just in time; at the last possible instant; just before it's too late. (*Typically: arrive ~; get there ~; happen ~; reach something ~; Save someone ~.) The doctor arrived in the nick of time. The patient's life was saved. I reached the airport in the very nick of time and made my flight.
See also: nick, of, time

nick something up

to make little dents or nicks in something, ruining the finish. Someone nicked the kitchen counter up. Who nicked up the coffeepot?
See also: nick, up

in the nick of time

Also, just in time. At the last moment, as in The police arrived in the nick of time, or He got there just in time for dinner. The first term began life as in the nick and dates from the 1500s, when nick meant "the critical moment" (a meaning now obsolete). The second employs just in the sense of "precisely" or "closely," a usage applied to time since the 1500s. Also see in time, def. 1.
See also: nick, of, time

in the nick of time

COMMON If something happens in the nick of time, it happens at the last possible moment, when it is almost too late. She woke up just in the nick of time and raised the alarm. They got to the hospital in the nick of time, just as the baby was about to be born.
See also: nick, of, time

in — nick

in a specified condition. British informal
1997 Ian Rankin Black & Blue Don't be fooled by the wheezing old pensioner routine. Eve's around fifty, still in good nick.
See also: nick

in the nick of time

only just in time; just at the critical moment.
Nick is used here in the sense of ‘the precise moment of an occurrence or an event’. This form of the phrase dates from the mid 17th century, but in the (very ) nick is recorded from the late 16th century.
1985 Nini Herman My Kleinian Home Time and again, when all seemed lost, I somehow won through in the nick of time.
See also: nick, of, time

nick someone for

cheat someone out of something, typically a sum of money. North American informal
1962 Washington Daily News Taxpayers… have heard rumblings that they might be nicked for about a million dollars each year to subsidize professional sports here.
See also: nick, someone

in good, bad, etc. ˈnick

(British English, informal) in good/bad condition or health: When I last saw him he looked in pretty good nick.She wants to sell the bike, but she won’t get very much for it because it’s in terrible nick.
See also: nick

in the ˌnick of ˈtime

(informal) at the last possible moment; just in time: He got to the railway station in the nick of time.He remembered in the nick of time that his passport was in his coat pocket.
See also: nick, of, time

full of the devil

and full of Old Nick
mod. always making mischief. Little Chucky is sure full of the devil. All those kids are full of Old Nick.
See also: devil, full, of

full of Old Nick

verb
See also: full, nick, of, old

nick

1. tv. to arrest someone. (see also nicked.) The cops nicked Paul outside his house.
2. tv. to steal something. The thugs nicked a couple of apples from the fruit stand.
3. tv. to get or take something. Tom nicked a copy of the test for Sam, who also needed one.
4. n. nicotine. I’m craving some nick.

nicked

mod. arrested. “Now I’m nicked,” he said.
See also: nick

full of the devil

Very energetic, mischievous, daring, or clever.
See also: devil, full, of

in the nick of time

Just at the critical moment; just in time.
See also: nick, of, time
References in periodicals archive ?
Buckingham may have been zonked out, but in 1975 Mick Fleetwood asked him and Nicks to join his band.
Call it revenge rock, call it soap opera, call it "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf With Guitar and Tambourine," over the decades, songs such as "Dreams" and "Go Your Own Way" have made millions of dollars for both Nicks and Buckingham.
To tackle high electricity costs, Nicks suggests exploring the NDP-supported concept of regional or local energy markets to capitalize on the low-cost generation of hydroelectricity.
Nicks says there appears to be no short-term fix for installing cheap additional capacity.
Even cooler, while buzzing through the tracks with the greatest capacity of heartbreak and bitterness, Nicks and Buckingham are stealing glances or singing directly to each other.
Nicks wore a diaphanous black dress Friday, draping it periodically with pinkish shawls or wraps and shaking a ribbon-festooned tambourine that - given the acoustics - only she could possibly hear.
Nicks added anatomy and kinesiology to his curriculum by reading Gray's Anatomy, at the New York Public Library.
Nicks proved so gifted that he was offered a fellowship to the school's master-teacher certification program in Dunham technique.
In 1981 Stevie Nicks released her first solo album which achieved five-times platinum status.
The forest policy for the (forest resources) division, which was recently rewritten, has some very explicit commitments about maintaining ecosystem functions and protecting bio-diversity," Nicks says.
Nicks says there are "policy-level commitments" that the company must now deliver on, in addition to expectations set by the government and the public.
One contestant was shown commenting on how "sexy" Nick was, telling viewers she wanted him "right now.
com/bachelor-2016-spoilers-6-hilarious-bios-nick-vialls-season-21-contestants-2457201) 30 women vying for his heart Nick takes issue from, though fans should be able to guess based on spoilers related to Season 21 of "The Bachelor.
The Bachelor" fans will have to wait several months to find out for sure if Nick finds love on the ABC series, but multiple reports have surfaced claiming that (http://www.
Nick was also present when Jade and now-husband Tanner Tolbert exchanged their I dos.