nick


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knick-knack

A trinket or bauble, typically one that is small and ornamental. I loved visiting my grandmother when I was a child and examining all the various knick-knacks she'd collected around the house.

Old Nick

An old-fashioned name for the devil in Christianity. Primarily heard in UK. After dating a vegetarian for six months, I would sell my soul to Old Nick for a big, juicy steak right about now.
See also: nick, old

in the nick of time

At the last possible moment before a deadline or before something begins or ends; just in time. That car moved off the track in the nick of time—another moment and the train would have smashed into it. You got here in the nick of time—we're just about to start the show.
See also: nick, of, time

in good/poor/etc. nick

In a certain condition, as specified by the adjective used before "nick." Can be used to refer to the physical condition of something or to someone's health. Primarily heard in UK. Our local football club has struggled in the last few years. We don't get many new players, and our pitch has been in poor nick for as long as I can remember. He had a long road to recovery after the surgery, but he's in good nick now.
See also: good, nick, poor

nick (one) for (something)

To cheat or swindle one out of something, especially money. The crooked mayor reportedly nicked taxpayers for nearly $1 million during his time in public office. Because they have a near-monopoly in the concert distribution market, the company is able to nick customers for all sorts of bogus extra charges that they add in at the last second.
See also: nick

full of the devil

Apt to get into trouble. Of course the kids got into the paint when they weren't supposed to—they were full of the devil today.
See also: devil, full, of

full of Old Nick

Apt to get into trouble. ("Old Nick" is an old-fashioned name for the devil in Christianity.) Of course the kids got into the paint when they weren't supposed to—they were full of Old Nick today.
See also: full, nick, of, old

nick up

To scuff, scratch, cut, or dent in multiple places the surface of something, especially one that had previously been free of blemishes. A noun or pronoun can be used between "nick" and "up." The movers I hired didn't put down protective padding and nicked up the top of my oak dressing table. Sarah has been nicking the side of my car up driving too close to the bushes next to the driveway when she backs out in the morning. I needed to shave on the flight, but the turbulence kept making me nick my neck up.
See also: nick, up

nick

1. To steal something, especially without the other person noticing. I managed to nick $20 out of my mom's purse, so let's go to the movies or something. I was just a dumb punk when I was in high school, skipping classes and nicking food from convenience stores.
2. To arrest someone. Often used in passive constructions. I heard the cops nicked Tom last night. I got nicked hotwiring a car behind the city courthouse. What are you in for?

full of the devil

 and full of Old Nick
always making mischief. Little Chuckie is sure full of the devil. Toward the end of the school year, the kids are always full of Old Nick.
See also: devil, full, of

*in the (very) nick of time

Fig. just in time; at the last possible instant; just before it's too late. (*Typically: arrive ~; get there ~; happen ~; reach something ~; Save someone ~.) The doctor arrived in the nick of time. The patient's life was saved. I reached the airport in the very nick of time and made my flight.
See also: nick, of, time

nick something up

to make little dents or nicks in something, ruining the finish. Someone nicked the kitchen counter up. Who nicked up the coffeepot?
See also: nick, up

in the nick of time

Also, just in time. At the last moment, as in The police arrived in the nick of time, or He got there just in time for dinner. The first term began life as in the nick and dates from the 1500s, when nick meant "the critical moment" (a meaning now obsolete). The second employs just in the sense of "precisely" or "closely," a usage applied to time since the 1500s. Also see in time, def. 1.
See also: nick, of, time

in the nick of time

COMMON If something happens in the nick of time, it happens at the last possible moment, when it is almost too late. She woke up just in the nick of time and raised the alarm. They got to the hospital in the nick of time, just as the baby was about to be born.
See also: nick, of, time

in — nick

in a specified condition. British informal
1997 Ian Rankin Black & Blue Don't be fooled by the wheezing old pensioner routine. Eve's around fifty, still in good nick.
See also: nick

in the nick of time

only just in time; just at the critical moment.
Nick is used here in the sense of ‘the precise moment of an occurrence or an event’. This form of the phrase dates from the mid 17th century, but in the (very ) nick is recorded from the late 16th century.
1985 Nini Herman My Kleinian Home Time and again, when all seemed lost, I somehow won through in the nick of time.
See also: nick, of, time

nick someone for

cheat someone out of something, typically a sum of money. North American informal
1962 Washington Daily News Taxpayers… have heard rumblings that they might be nicked for about a million dollars each year to subsidize professional sports here.
See also: nick, someone

in good, bad, etc. ˈnick

(British English, informal) in good/bad condition or health: When I last saw him he looked in pretty good nick.She wants to sell the bike, but she won’t get very much for it because it’s in terrible nick.
See also: nick

in the ˌnick of ˈtime

(informal) at the last possible moment; just in time: He got to the railway station in the nick of time.He remembered in the nick of time that his passport was in his coat pocket.
See also: nick, of, time

full of the devil

and full of Old Nick
mod. always making mischief. Little Chucky is sure full of the devil. All those kids are full of Old Nick.
See also: devil, full, of

full of Old Nick

verb
See also: full, nick, of, old

nick

1. tv. to arrest someone. (see also nicked.) The cops nicked Paul outside his house.
2. tv. to steal something. The thugs nicked a couple of apples from the fruit stand.
3. tv. to get or take something. Tom nicked a copy of the test for Sam, who also needed one.
4. n. nicotine. I’m craving some nick.

nicked

mod. arrested. “Now I’m nicked,” he said.
See also: nick

full of the devil

Very energetic, mischievous, daring, or clever.
See also: devil, full, of

in the nick of time

Just at the critical moment; just in time.
See also: nick, of, time

nick of time, (just) in the

At the last minute, just in time. This term comes from a now obsolete meaning of nick, that is, “the critical moment.” A 1577 chronicle states, “The Romane navie . . . arrived at the very pinch, or as commonly we say, in the nicke.” Nearly a century later of time was added to clarify the issue, although just in the nick continued to be used for many years. It probably was a cliché by the time Sir Walter Scott wrote (The Pirate, 1821), “The fortunate arrival of Gordaunt, in the very nick of time.”
See also: nick, of
References in periodicals archive ?
The two Giants communicated at length about Nick's career with the club, which spanned from 1979 to 1981.
Enough of a crowd was surrounding her by now that it didn't really matter, because Nick would never get close enough to talk to her anyway.
Nick's wife Sufia said: "Nick is and was so immensely important to me, but at times like this I see how important he still is to others as well.
But Nick has never been shy about his "commitment issues" and previously revealed his relationships have a 6 month expiration date.
Carla says she's off to Nottingham to check out his restaurant, but Nick talks her out of it, promising to tell all.
A preview clip for the week's episodes (see above) shows Rey telling Nick he is under arrest, and Nick is also seen being photographed for a mugshot.
"We are hoping that Nick will be able to fly over in August this year so that these lovebirds can be together again once more to share their love."
Several of Hemingway's handwritten alterations, with cross-outs and additions, evoke Nick's vernacular voice in "Big-Two Hearted River." One notable example from part one is when Hemingway works to find the right phrase to express Nick's wonder at seeing a mist at dusk rising across the river in the swamp.
Fran, who was speaking before last night's concert in Nick's memory at London's Shepherd's Bush Empire, said he first met Nick at the Barrowland in Glasgow.
Clave tagged Marvin Bernardo as the one who stabbed Nick in the attack that was recorded by a barangay security camera.
Last year Nick had his dream thwarted when the powerful earthquake, which killed at least 6,000 people and injured at least 8,000 people across Nepal, triggered an avalanche which almost claimed his life.
>Adventurer Nick Talbot on Mount Everest ACYSTIC fibrosis sufferer from County Durham has become the first person living with the condition to summit Mount Everest.
Raymond stars in the 2015 Cinema One Originals film festival entry "Dahling Nick," a biopic celebrating the life and works of National Artist for Literature Nick Joaquin.