news


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bearer of bad news

Literally, someone who delivers bad news. The bearer often identifies as such as an introductory warning that they have bad news to deliver. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but I'm afraid your grandfather passed away late last night. We were celebrating our teacher's absence until Susie, the bearer of bad news, told us that the principal was coming to give us our exam.
See also: bad, bearer, news, of

go abroad and you'll hear news of home

Once one is no longer at home, one becomes more interested or invested in news of home and family as it circulates second-hand. A: "Are you sure that Sir Gregory is selling the estate?" B: "Indeed. Go abroad and you'll hear news of home, my good man."
See also: abroad, and, go, hear, home, news, of

make news

To garner attention and be the topic of conversation. Sam's sudden resignation really made news today—everyone in the office is talking about it!
See also: make, news

bad news travels fast

Bad news circulates quickly (because people are apt to hear it and then share it with others). A: "How does the whole school already know that I got suspended?" B: "Well, bad news travels fast."
See also: bad, fast, news, travel

be bad news

slang To be, or be perceived as, unpleasant or unsavory. Stay away from that gang of kids from the other side of town—they're bad news. Coach lets me play a lot, so if he gets fired, it will be bad news for me. Our wedding is this weekend, so a snowstorm would be bad news indeed!
See also: bad, news

fake news

1. Fabricated news reports presented as authentic. As they aim to drive web traffic to the providing website, they often have provocative headlines. That story is clearly fake news, spreading lies in support of a thinly-veiled political agenda.
2. By extension, any news report that one judges to be biased or inaccurate. That article came from a legitimate site, so you can't just dismiss it as fake news.
See also: fake, news

break the news

To reveal information, often that which is bad or upsetting. Who is going to break the news of her husband's accident? Your mother is going to be furious if she learns of our engagement from someone else—you have to break the news to her first!
See also: break, news

(that's) news to (one)

This is something I was not aware about or did not know. A: "Yeah, Jeff and Anthony have been going out for a few months now." B: "News to me. I thought they were just friends." We're not allowed to dump grass clippings here? That's news to me!
See also: news

No news is good news

If you hear nothing or receive no updates, it means that everything is going as it should and nothing bad has happened. We should be able to maintain production as expected, so for now no news is good news. My son has been living abroad for nearly 10 years now. At first I used to get anxious when I didn't hear from him, but now I know that no news is good news.
See also: good, news, no

be good news

To be beneficial to someone or something. This storm changing direction is really good news for those of us on the coast.
See also: good, news

be news to (one)

To be something that one was not aware of or did not know. A: "Yeah, Jeff and Anthony have been going out for a few months now." B: "Well, that's news to me. I thought they were just friends." You aren't allowed to dump your grass clippings here? Well, that's news to me!
See also: news

yesterday's news

Someone or something that is no longer receiving or worthy of public interest, importance, or influence. I don't know why you're still campaigning for that hack—he's yesterday's news. The once-prominent social media platform is now yesterday's news among a new generation of smartphone users.
See also: news

bad news

1. slang Someone or something that is, or is perceived as, unpleasant or unsavory. Stay away from that gang of kids from the other side of town—they're bad news. Coach lets me play a lot, so if he gets fired, it will be bad news for me. Our wedding is this weekend, so a snowstorm would be bad news indeed!
2. The cost of something. I got the receipt so we can see the bad news.
See also: bad, news

(it's) news to (one)

This is something I was not aware about or did not know. A: "Yeah, Jeff and Anthony have been going out for a few months now." B: "It's news to me. I thought they were just friends." We're not allowed to dump grass clippings here? Hmm, news to me!
See also: news

newshound

A news journalist who is exceptionally aggressive, vigorous, or persistent in the pursuit of a story or its details. He's gotten a reputation as being a bit of a newshound at these conventions, so most politicians try avoid him altogether. Look, I've got enough issues on my plate without having some newshound like you barging in here harassing me to get a quote.

Bad news travels fast.

Prov. Information about trouble or misfortune disseminates quickly (more quickly than good news). John: Hi, Andy. I'm sorry to hear you got fired. Andy: How did you know about that already? It only happened this morning. John: Bad news travels fast. I called my mother to tell her about my car accident, but my aunt had already told her. Bad news travels fast.
See also: bad, fast, news, travel

break the news (to someone)

to tell someone some important news, usually bad news. The doctor had to break the news to Jane about her husband's cancer. I hope that the doctor broke the news gently.
See also: break, news

No news is good news

. Not hearing any news signifies that nothing is wrong. Fred: I wonder if Jill is doing all right in her new job. Jane: No news is good news. Jane: I'm worried about my sister. She hasn't called me for months. Alan: No news is good news, right?
See also: good, news, no

That's news to me.

I did not know that.; I had not been informed of that. Bill: They've blocked off Maple Street for some repairs. Tom: That's news to me. Sally: The telephones are out. None of them work. Bill: That's news to me.
See also: news

bad news

1. An unwelcome thing or person, trouble. For example, That fire was bad news; we were underinsured for the damage, or No one wants Mary on the board-she's bad news. This term transfers literal bad news-the report of an unhappy recent event-to an unwanted or undesirable individual or circumstance. [Slang; 1920s]
2. The amount charged for something, as in Waiter, bring our check-I want to see the bad news. [Slang; 1920s]
See also: bad, news

break the news

Make something known, as in We suspected that she was pregnant but waited for her to break the news to her in-laws. This term, in slightly different form ( break a matter or break a business), dates from the early 1500s. Another variant is the 20th-century journalistic phrase, break a story, meaning "to reveal a news item or make it available for publication."
See also: break, news

no news is good news

Having no information means that bad developments are unlikely, as in I haven't heard from them in a month, but no news is good news. This proverbial phrase may have originated with King James I of England, who allegedly said "No news is better than evil news" (1616).
See also: good, news, no

be bad news

COMMON If you say that someone is bad news, you mean that they have a bad character and are likely to cause trouble. We've separated and I'm glad. He was bad news.
See also: bad, news

be news to someone

COMMON If someone says something and you say that it is news to you, you mean that you did not know about it before. So she's an experienced babysitter, is she? This is news to me. People have been telling me I've been in meetings about selling my business. All I can say is that it's news to me. Note: You usually use this expression to express surprise at what has been said, or to suggest that it may not be true.
See also: news, someone

break the news

COMMON If you break the news, you tell someone about something, especially something bad. I went up to Santa Monica to break the news to her that I'd left my job.
See also: break, news

no news is good news

You say no news is good news to mean that if you do not hear new information about a situation, it is probably because nothing bad has happened. I had heard nothing all week. `Oh well,' I thought. `No news is good news.' Note: People sometimes vary this expression, for example saying no news is bad news meaning that a lack of information about a situation is worrying. People always suspect that no news is bad news. No news is not always good news.
See also: good, news, no

be bad news

be a problem or handicap. informal
1996 City Paper (Baltimore) From the moment we see Mark Wahlberg… surrounded by pool-hall scumbags, we know he's bad news.
See also: bad, news

be good news

be an asset; be commendable or admirable. informal
See also: good, news

be news to

be information not previously known to (someone), and perhaps regarded as implausible. informal
2004 NZine – New Zealand Ezine This was the first we had heard about it, and indeed it was news to the local community and the Hurunui District Council.
See also: news

no news is good news

without information to the contrary you can assume that all is well. proverb
See also: good, news, no

yesterday's news

a person or thing that is no longer of interest.
See also: news

be bad ˈnews (for somebody/something)

be likely to cause problems for somebody/something: Central heating is bad news for indoor plants.
See also: bad, news

be good ˈnews (for somebody/something)

be likely to be helpful or give an advantage for somebody/something: The cut in interest rates is good news for homeowners.
See also: good, news

break the ˈnews (to somebody)

be the first to tell somebody some bad news: I’m sorry to be the one to break the news.
See also: break, news

it’s/that’s ˌnews to ˈme

used to express surprise at some information that you have just heard: ‘Max is thinking of leaving his job.’ ‘Really? That’s news to me. I thought he was happy there.’
See also: news

ˌno news is ˈgood news

(saying) if there were bad news you would hear it, so if you have not heard anything that means everything must be all right: He’s been in the mountains for a week without contacting us. I just hope no news is good news.
See also: good, news, no

bad news

1. n. the bill for something. Here comes the bad news.
2. mod. unpleasant; unfortunate; repellent. That poor guy is really bad news.
See also: bad, news

newshound

n. a newspaper reporter who pursues a story with the same diligence used by a bloodhound. Tell that newshound that I’ll sue her if she prints that!

bad news/good news

Also, good news/bad news. This phrase and its reverse are generally used to make an announcement of both unfavorable and favorable circumstances. The “good news” generally mitigates the “bad news,” as in “You got a D-minus on the math test but an A on your English essay.” A twentieth-century usage, it is often found in headlines, such as “Sports Redux: Good News, Bad News,” reporting a baseball game in which the Red Sox led in runs but their pitcher then allowed the Rays enough runs to win. Similarly, a New York Times column by Thomas L. Friedman remarked on the arrest of eleven Russian sleeper agents: “. . . this is actually a good news/bad news story. The good news is that someone still wants to spy on us. The bad news is that it’s the Russians” (July 14, 2010).
See also: bad, good, news

no news is good news

To hear nothing means that all is well. This proverbial phrase dates from the early seventeenth century. King James I is supposed to have said, in 1616, “No newis is bettir than evill newis,” and the adage has been quoted again and again over the centuries, by James Howell, Charles Dickens, and Noël Coward, among others.
See also: good, news, no
References in classic literature ?
The foreman of a Pittsburg coal company may now stand in his subterranean office and talk to the president of the Steel Trust, who sits on the twenty-first floor of a New York skyscraper.
In the refining of oil, the Standard Oil Company alone, at its New York office, sends two hundred and thirty thousand messages a year.
It has one hundred and seventy-five exchanges, four hundred operators, thirteen thousand telephones, and twenty thousand miles of wire--a more ample system than the city of New York had in 1896.
It is one of the most incredible miracles of telephony that a passenger at New York, who is about to start for Chicago on a fast express, may telephone to Chicago from the drawing-room of a Pullman.
A paper of the first class, such as The New York World, has now an outfit of twenty trunk lines and eighty telephones.
When instant action is needed in the city of New York, a General Alarm can in five minutes be sent by the police wires over its whole vast area of three hundred square miles.
After the destruction of Messina, an order for enough lumber to build ten thousand new houses was cabled to New York and telephoned to Western lumbermen.
Harriet said, "very true," and she "would not think about it;" but still she talked of itstill she could talk of nothing else; and Emma, at last, in order to put the Martins out of her head, was obliged to hurry on the news, which she had meant to give with so much tender caution; hardly knowing herself whether to rejoice or be angry, ashamed or only amused, at such a state of mind in poor Harrietsuch a conclusion of Mr.
"A new neighbour for us all, Miss Woodhouse!" said Miss Bates, joyfully; "my mother is so pleased!she says she cannot bear to have the poor old Vicarage without a mistress.
Lizabetha Prokofievna received confirmatory news from the princess--and alas, two months after the prince's first departure from St.
To make an end, we may say that there were many changes in the Epanchin household in the spring, so that it was not difficult to forget the prince, who sent no news of himself.
Have the least confidence in man or woman!" he cried in bitter tones, as he sat with his new friends in prison, and recounted to them his favourite stories of the siege of Kars, and the resuscitated soldier.
He made many new friends; and was moreover, a frequent visitor at the debtor's prison, to which he invariably accompanied his mother.
He had actually borrowed Gania's new green tie for the occasion, without saying why he wanted it, in order to impress her.
"Our market research uncovered a strong appetite from Arab audiences for a high calibre, independent news channel which delivers news in real time and across multiple media platforms, be they high definition television sets, the internet, smart phones or tablets.