new lease on life, a

a new lease on life

An occasion or opportunity for a renewed enjoyment in, enthusiasm for, or appreciation of one's life. After finding out that the tests came back negative, I feel as though I've been given a new lease on life! Mary's gotten a new lease on life ever since her daughter was born.
See also: lease, life, new, on

new lease on life

A new chance to happy, healthy, or successful after surviving a hardship. After the doctor declared that her cancer was in remission, Harriet felt like she had a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, new, on

new lease on life

Cliché a renewed and revitalized outlook on life. Getting the job offer was a new lease on life. When I got out of the hospital, I felt as if I had a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, new, on

new lease on life

A fresh start; renewed vigor and good health, as in Since they bought his store Dad has had a new lease on life. This term with its allusion to a rental agreement dates from the early 1800s and originally referred only to recovery from illness. By the mid-1800s it was applied to any kind of fresh beginning.
See also: lease, life, new, on

a new lease on life

An opportunity to improve one's circumstances or outlook.
See also: lease, life, new, on

new lease on life, a

Renewed health and vigor; a fresh start, or opportunity for improvement. This seemingly very modern expression alluding to a new rental agreement dates from the early nineteenth century. Sir Walter Scott used it in a letter of 1809 concerning an invalid friend who appeared to be improving: “My friend has since taken out a new lease of life and . . . may . . . live as long as I shall.” By the mid-nineteenth century it had been transferred to any kind of fresh start.
See also: lease, new, on