new lease on life

a new lease on life

1. An occasion or opportunity for a renewed enjoyment in, enthusiasm for, or appreciation of one's life. After finding out that the tests came back negative, I feel as though I've been given a new lease on life! Mary's gotten a new lease on life ever since her daughter was born. A: "Pat certainly has a new of life these days." B: "Yeah, I hear he's got a new girlfriend—that might have something to do with it."
2. An extension or increase in the time in which something or someone can be useful or successful. Primarily heard in UK. Our company was given a new lease on life when we partnered with the global corporation. John's film got a new lease on life when his wealthy grandfather agreed to fund the rest of the production. That new engine has really given my car a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, new, on

new lease on life

A new chance to happy, healthy, or successful after surviving a hardship. After the doctor declared that her cancer was in remission, Harriet felt like she had a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, new, on
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

new lease on life

Cliché a renewed and revitalized outlook on life. Getting the job offer was a new lease on life. When I got out of the hospital, I felt as if I had a new lease on life.
See also: lease, life, new, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

new lease on life

A fresh start; renewed vigor and good health, as in Since they bought his store Dad has had a new lease on life. This term with its allusion to a rental agreement dates from the early 1800s and originally referred only to recovery from illness. By the mid-1800s it was applied to any kind of fresh beginning.
See also: lease, life, new, on
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a new lease on life

An opportunity to improve one's circumstances or outlook.
See also: lease, life, new, on
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

new lease on life, a

Renewed health and vigor; a fresh start, or opportunity for improvement. This seemingly very modern expression alluding to a new rental agreement dates from the early nineteenth century. Sir Walter Scott used it in a letter of 1809 concerning an invalid friend who appeared to be improving: “My friend has since taken out a new lease of life and . . . may . . . live as long as I shall.” By the mid-nineteenth century it had been transferred to any kind of fresh start.
See also: lease, new, on
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
William Marr, "Tenant vs Owner Occupied Farms in York County," in Canadian Papers in Rural History 4 (1984): 50-70; idem, "The Distribution of Tenant Agriculture: Ontario, Canada, 1871," Social Science History 11, 2 (1987): 169-186; and idem, "Nineteenth Century Tenancy Rates in Ontario's Counties, 1881 and 1891," Journal of Social History 21 (1988): 753-764; and Catharine Anne Wilson, A New Lease on Life: Landlords, Tenants and Immigrants in Ireland and Canada (Kingston/Montreal, 1994).
1996): 113-142; Wilson, A New Lease on Life; and William Dowling, "Tenant Right: Agrarian Capitalism and Traditional Agriculture in Rural Ulster 1600-1850, Unpublished PhD dissertation, University of Wisconsin, 1994.
Sullivan Report 1837, 437-54; and Wilson, A New Lease on Life, 127-8.
The beauty of this novel is that it suggests the possibilities of transcendence (a new lease on life) by focusing on their absence.