never-never land


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Never Never Land

A fictional place where everything is perfect and everyone is happy. Taken from the name of the fantastical place in the stories of Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie. Often shortened to "Never Land." She must think that the real world is a Never Never Land if she expects a high-paying job to be waiting for her once she's out of college!
See also: land, never

never-never land

A fantasy land, an imaginary place, as in I don't know what's gotten into Marge-she's way off in never-never land. This expression gained currency when James Barrie used it in Peter Pan (1904) for the place where Peter and the Lost Boys live. However, in the second half of the 1800s Australians already were using it for vast unsettled areas of their continent ( the outback), and there the term became popular through Mrs. Aeneas Gunn's We of the Never Never (1908). In Australia it still refers to northwest Queensland or northern Australia in general. Elsewhere it simply signifies a fantasy or daydream.
See also: land

never-never land

an imaginary utopian place or situation.
This expression is often used with allusion to the imaginary country in J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan ( 1904 ). The term was used earlier to denote the remote and unpopulated northern part of the Northern Territory and Queensland in Australia (from which, it is implied, a person might never return).
See also: land
References in periodicals archive ?
But Labour hit back, accusing the SNP of "living in never-never land"over the real extent of the oil wealth.
Those with initiative move to areas where they can improve the family income, rather than inhabiting a never-never land of false hopes and stifled dreams.
Craig Denston's sweet orange set, a wooden hut with sloping roof and cuckoo clock, evokes the strange never-never land of fairy tales and there is much fun to be had with dressing up and dancing.
He skipped through Never-Never Land with him climbing trees and encouraging him to expose his troubled and confused character.
She is one of the dynasty which founded and still runs the Italianate village of Portmeirion, the magical never-never land built on a tiny peninsula jutting out into the Glaslyn estuary that was dreamt up by her late father, renowned architect Sir Clough Williams-Ellis.
The Tories seem to be living in a never-never land where black is white and two and two make 22.
The truth is that Tory promises on public services belong in never-never land. They are actually pledged to cut pounds 16 billion from public spending which can only mean fewer doctors and nurses, fewer teachers and fewer police.
Discover where the inspiration came for Captain Hook and Never-Never Land in JM Barrie and Peter Pan (BBC2, December 23, 8.10pm).
It also examines his obsession with perpetual childhood, a Never-Never Land of children who, dying young, never grow to maturity.
The four-part epic is set in the never-never land of Gormenghast.
In spite of the Grand Viennese name change, the costume theme remains faithful to satirising the Ruritanian pre-WWI Middle European never-never land. This was made famous by Anthony Hope's 1894 swash-buckling adventure yarn, The Prisoner of Zenda , later becoming a 1937 Hollywood classic starring Ronald Colman.
But away from the SNP's Never-Never land, McLeish's Executive have dealt with the problems Scotland has in the real world.
It is also set in never-never land, a wonderful world where trout poaching is as bad as crime gets and a brain-dead bobby like Nick Rowan (Nick Berry) can be promoted.
The theory was that he was trying to make himself look like the young Liz Taylor, but now it seems he is aiming for a creature from Never-Never Land - the little boy who never grew up.