References in classic literature ?
Many bees are parasitic, and always lay their eggs in the nests of bees of other kinds.
They are incapable of making their own nests, or of feeding their own larvae.
"If," said he, "a finch's nest is placed on the Serpentine it fills and breaks to pieces, but a thrush's nest is still as dry as the cup of a swan's back."
Solomon explained hastily that what he meant was not one of the cumbrous boats that humans use; the proposed boat was to be simply a thrush's nest large enough to hold Peter.
The nest, whence it takes its name, is placed in the most exposed situations, as on the top of a post, a bare rock, or on a cactus.
The Casarita builds its nest at the bottom of a narrow cylindrical hole, which is said to extend horizontally to nearly six feet under ground.
Then at last he understood, and clutched the nest and waved his thanks to the bird as she fluttered overhead.
Then he got into the nest, reared the stave in it as a mast, and hung up his shirt for a sail.
--However, I say, Scud, we're all going after a hawk's nest to-morrow, in Caldecott's Spinney; and if you'll come and behave yourself, we'll have a stunning climb."
I'm for the hawk's nest, and anything that turns up."
"Of course they will," said Tip; "for this is their nest. And there must be hundreds of them," he continued, "for see what a lot of things they have brought here!"
Indeed, the nest was half filled with a most curious collection of small articles for which the birds could have no use, but which the thieving Jackdaws had stolen during many years from the homes of men.
I was somewhat older than during the nest days, but still helpless.
They carried them away in bags, and stored them in several hollow stumps near the tree where they had built their nest.
Timmy rolled over and over, and then turned tail and fled towards his nest, followed by a crowd of squirrels shouting --"Who's-been digging-up MY-nuts?"