nester

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empty nest

A family home inhabited by parents after their children have grown up and departed. Many parents feel depressed when they are left in an empty nest.
See also: empty, nest

empty nester

A parent whose children have moved out of the home. When our youngest goes off to college next year, we'll officially be empty nesters.
See also: empty, nester
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

empty nest

The home of parents whose children have grown up and moved out. For example, Now that they had an empty nest, Jim and Jane opened a bed-and-breakfast. This expression, alluding to a nest from which baby birds have flown, gave rise to such related ones as empty-nester, for a parent whose children had moved out, and empty-nest syndrome, for the state of mind of parents whose children had left. [c. 1970]
See also: empty, nest
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

an empty nester

An empty nester is a parent whose children have left home. I'm trying to prepare myself for becoming an empty nester when my youngest child goes to university.
See also: empty, nester
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

empty nester

a person whose children have grown up and left home. informal
See also: empty, nester
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

empty-nesters

n. parents whose children have grown and moved out. There are a few adjustments that empty-nesters have to make.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

empty nest, empty nester

A home from which the grown children have moved out, leaving some unoccupied bedrooms; also, the parent(s) in such a home. The term has also given rise to “empty nest syndrome,” the feelings of sadness engendered by the situation. An NBC sitcom entitled Empty Nest aired from 1988 to 1995. The expression dates from the second half of the 1900s.
See also: empty, nester
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
We aimed to provide empirical evidence concerning the status of depression of empty nesters in rural China and to propose corresponding countermeasures to improve their mental health.
Though most are enjoying the extra space and freedom, a quarter (26%) say that they don't enjoy being an Empty Nester with 14% saying that it's difficult to live in the property now that it feels empty.
But a quarter (26%) say they do not enjoy being an empty nester and 14% say they find it difficult to live in the property now that it feels empty.
Empty nesters are feeling more positive about their personal finances than younger generations, who have greater concerns about the employment market and saving for the future."
However, while full nesters may have to wait some time for their loved ones to leave home, they may find that there are benefits in the future.
The amount is PS100 a month more than "empty nesters", adding up to an extra PS1,200 a year.
One in 11 (9%) of full nesters said they were going as far as to skip meals to meet the cost of everyday living.
Rhoades advises empty nesters not to rush into any move, especially one that puts them in a very different type of living situation.
Twenty-four percent of Americans who participated in the survey are Good Nesters. These individuals are focused on their families.
When Arthur Hill wrote the Nesters regarding the building of a champion load, they accepted the challenge at once.
Chicklit The Empty Nesters, Nina Bell, Sphere, pounds 7.99 Clover Jones and Laura Dangerfield have been best friends since their children were born.
Although he didn't resort to taking on either of these new responsibilities, one full year since both his daughter, Ruby, 23, and son, Evan, 19, have been gone, he says that joining the ranks of Alaska's empty nesters has not been easy.
Women and Digital Lifestyles special analysis was designed to understand the emerging digital lifestyles of American women and key drivers of adoption in four lifestages: young singles, moms with young kids, moms with tweens/teens and empty nesters. The primary data source for the analysis is SRG's Digital Life America syndicated study based on tracking studies of the U.S.
"I've been surprised by the number of people who are empty nesters and still wanting that bigger house or new house with everything they want."