nervous

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be frightened of (one's) (own) shadow

To be easily or constantly spooked, nervous, timid, afraid, or fearfully suspicious. I can't say I have much faith in Johnny helping us on this expedition—that boy's frightened of his own shadow!
See also: frighten, of, shadow

be nervous of (one's) (own) shadow

To be easily or constantly spooked, nervous, timid, afraid, or fearfully suspicious. I can't say I have much faith in Johnny helping us on this expedition—that boy's nervous of his own shadow!
See also: nervous, of, shadow

be scared of (one's) (own) shadow

To be easily or constantly spooked, nervous, timid, afraid, or fearfully suspicious. I can't say I have much faith in Johnny helping us on this expedition—that boy's scared of his own shadow!
See also: of, scare, shadow

nervous Nellie

Someone, either male or female, who is more timid, nervous, or anxious than is normal or reasonable. My mother's always a bit of a nervous Nellie around the grandkids, so she doesn't like to look after them. I'm too much of a nervous Nellie to ever do something like sky diving.
See also: Nellie, nervous

nervous wreck

Someone who is overcome with anxiety, apprehension, or nervousness. Where have you been all night? I've been a nervous wreck waiting for you to come home! I'm going to be a nervous wreck waiting to hear back from the doctor about the test results.
See also: nervous, wreck

nervous Nellie

An unduly timid or anxious person, as in He's a real nervous Nellie, calling the doctor about every little symptom. This term does not allude to a particular person named Nellie; rather, the name was probably chosen for the sake of alliteration. [Colloquial; c. 1920]
See also: Nellie, nervous

nervous wreck

An individual suffering from extreme agitation or worry, as in Pat was a nervous wreck until her mother arrived at the wedding. This expression is nearly always used hyperbolically. [Colloquial; c. 1900] Also see basket case.
See also: nervous, wreck

be frightened/nervous/scared of your own ˈshadow

be very easily frightened; be very nervous: Since the attack he’s been a changed man. He’s nervous of his own shadow and doesn’t like to go out alone at night.

nervous Nellie

n. any nervous person, male or female. Sue is such a nervous Nellie. She should calm down.
See also: Nellie, nervous
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than forcefully asserting a unified reading of anxiety onto the literary texts she examines and their historical and cultural contexts, Murison is instead interested in how anxiety and nervousness provided a "flexible vocabulary" for nineteenth-century authors to express several different, and at times conflicting, experiences and ideas about nervousness (3).
Blakey is now 18 months old and did start her training course, but again her nervousness meant she was not quite brave enough to go through to the next stage.
But this nervousness is illogical, the panic unnecessary.
Nervousness" entails a significant change in the MRP plans even in case of minor changes in the higher-level MRP, or MPS (notably, an issue apparently never discussed in the known literature is that nervousness is present even with stable demand, in the form of irregular order releases).
There's a nervousness in the squad that's been brought forward by the results here," said Sturrock after Saturday's 1-1 draw with Accrington.
Liverpool won't give them any time for the kind of hesitancy or nervousness they showed against West Ham, and Everton can go into it knowing a win would put them right back in the driving seat for that final Champions League qualification place.
The first neurological clinic opened in Stockholm in 1887, and by the end of the century, nervousness had become established as a national malady in Sweden.
Available at the same price point, Calms Forte 4 Kids is an all-natural solution for symptoms of restlessness, nervousness, irritability and wakefulness in children older than two.
You still sense a little nervousness when debunking many of the standard, often nonsense, ideas of the great and the good of the architectural establishment.
To ease his nervousness, Sam usually coerces his morns into competing in hours-long marathons of PlayStation or Xbox.
At first she attributed her nervousness, tremors and thicker neck to job stress or a virus.
The most commonly reported adverse events in pivotal studies are insomnia and nervousness.
Nervousness releases adrenaline, increases your heartbeat, and directs your blood flow to your vital organs.
To assess health effects, they evaluated selected performance measures, as well as 33 observed and self-reported physical and behavioral indicators, such as headache, nausea, eye irritation, nervousness, and leg cramps.
The person might display nervousness, an unwillingness to make eye contact or excessive sweating.