near beer


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near beer

A beer-like malt beverage that contains less than 0.5% alcohol. I didn't want anyone to know I was pregnant, so I said I could only drink near beer because I was taking antibiotics. I have to drive home later, so I'm sticking to the near beer.
See also: beer, near

near-beer

n. beer with less than 1/2 percent alcohol content. (Originally from the Prohibition era.) You can drink a lot of near-beer without getting drunk.
References in periodicals archive ?
The median age of male near beer buyers is 48; for women it's 43.
The Virtual Harlem project http://www.evluic.edu/cavern harlem/), which recreates the experience of walking the streets of Harlem in the 1920s, is an excellent example, as is the Near Beer Game Simulation (http://forio.
Premium Near Beer has been a regular supporter of Crohn's and Colitis Canada and the Canadian Liver Foundation.
During Prohibition, Marti oversaw the production of near beer, candy and soda drinks at August Schell.
Yuengling, who purchased the brewery when his father Frederick died in 1899, produced "near beers" during Prohibition.
Eames observes that "near beer" was brwed by many American regional breweries i nthe 1800s.
Pointing to a dramatic rise in alcohol abuse among teen-agers last year, Chief Keith Smith said "near beer" is only boosting the numbers higher, especially because there's little law enforcement officials can do about it.
Ironically, the near beer that came out during Prohibition way back in the early thirties was not a bad product.
Lemp, like many other brewers, responded with "near beer." The company's nonalcoholic brew was named Cerva.
We're talking about non-alcolohic malt beverages here, formerly dubbed "near beer."
Other nontraditional beverages that may prove to be important in reviving the category are nonalcoholic beer, or near beer, which has proven popular with both sexes.
Shortly thereafter, Griesedieck entered receivership, but the company renamed itself the Falstaff Corp., and survived Prohibition by making near beer and curing ham.
All of these breweries stopped making beer by 1920, although many eked out a living during Prohibition making soft drinks or near beer. There was a rush of speculative interest in the industry after Repeal, but many of these companies did not prove to be long-term players.
"Anything they could to make money, they did," Bryson said, including making so-called "near beer," which is a brew with .5 percent alcohol.
Many gluten-free "near beers" are available, but unfortunately most of them do not taste very beer-like.