References in classic literature ?
I would have every man so much like a wild antelope, so much a part and parcel of nature, that his very person should thus sweetly advertise our senses of his presence, and remind us of those parts of nature which he most haunts.
Why not put my house, my parlor, behind this plot, instead of behind that meager assemblage of curiosities, that poor apology for a Nature and Art, which I call my front yard?
Poor Marner went out with that despair in his soul--that shaken trust in God and man, which is little short of madness to a loving nature.
But nature, it seems, has not been so expert a school-mistress; and these politer pleasures are entirely the productions of art and reason on our side of the globe.
Nature enhances her beauty, to the eye of loving men, from their belief that the poet is beholding her shows at the same time.
Too feeble fall the impressions of nature on us to make us artists.
The account of the Platonic ideas in the Meno is the simplest and clearest, and we shall best illustrate their nature by giving this first and then comparing the manner in which they are described elsewhere, e.
The magnificent figure under which the nature of the soul is described has not much to do with the popular doctrine of the ideas.
I mean to say that there do exist natures gifted with those opposite qualities.
Stand before each of its tablets and say, 'Under this mask did my Proteus nature hide itself.
Again, those species which are distinguished one from another and opposed one to another within the same genus are said to be 'simultaneous' in nature.
Voice indeed, as being the token of pleasure and pain, is imparted to others also, and thus much their nature is capable of, to perceive pleasure and pain, and to impart these sensations to others; but it is by speech that we are enabled to express what is useful for us, and what is hurtful, and of course what is just and what is unjust: for in this particular man differs from other animals, that he alone has a perception of good and evil, of just and unjust, and it is a participation of these common sentiments which forms a family and a city.
It has been seen in the last chapter that amongst organic beings in a state of nature there is some individual variability; indeed I am not aware that this has ever been disputed.
First and always in considering any piece of literature a student should ask himself the question already implied: Does it present a true portrayal of life--of the permanent elements in all life and in human nature, of the life or thought of its own particular period, and (in most sorts of books) of the persons, real or imaginary, with whom it deals?
In reality, true nature is as difficult to be met with in authors, as the Bayonne ham, or Bologna sausage, is to be found in the shops.