nation


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all nations

obsolete In a dram shop (a place that sold alcoholic beverages), the mixture of the remaining portions of distilled alcohol emptied and collected into a single container or vessel. It's a shame to see the all nations thrown away at the end of day, made up as it is of so many different drinks.
See also: all, nation

one nation

A country not separated by political ideologies or social inequalities. It is in times like these that we must stand together as one nation, putting aside our differences and banding together for the common good.
See also: nation, one

the gaiety of nations

The enjoyment and amusement of people around the world. The venerated actor has not only added to the gaiety of nations with his performances, but also been a key figure in raising money and awareness for some of the most important charities around the world.
See also: nation, of

the gaiety of nations

general cheerfulness or amusement. British
In The Lives of the English Poets, Samuel Johnson wrote about the death of the great actor David Garrick ( 1717–79 ), remarking that it ‘has eclipsed the gaiety of nations and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure’.
See also: nation, of

one nation

a nation not divided by social inequality.
One nation was a political slogan of the 1990s, associated especially with the debate between the right and left wings of the British Conservative Party.
See also: nation, one
References in classic literature ?
Few nations, nevertheless, have been more frequently engaged in war; and the wars in which that kingdom has been engaged have, in numerous instances, proceeded from the people.
The wars of these two last-mentioned nations have in a great measure grown out of commercial considerations, -- the desire of supplanting and the fear of being supplanted, either in particular branches of traffic or in the general advantages of trade and navigation, and sometimes even the more culpable desire of sharing in the commerce of other nations without their consent.
So far is the general sense of mankind from corresponding with the tenets of those who endeavor to lull asleep our apprehensions of discord and hostility between the States, in the event of disunion, that it has from long observation of the progress of society become a sort of axiom in politics, that vicinity or nearness of situation, constitutes nations natural enemies.
All this the telephone is doing, at a total cost to the nation of probably $200,000,000 a year-- no more than American farmers earn in ten days.
It arrived at the exact period when it was needed for the organization of great cities and the unification of nations.
We have not been satisfied with establishing such a system of transportation that we can start any day for anywhere from anywhere else; neither have we been satisfied with establishing such a system of communication that news and gossip are the common property of all nations.
She was the colossus of the nations, and swiftly her voice was heard in no uncertain tones in the affairs and councils of the nations.
France wept and wailed, wrung her impotent hands and appealed to the dumfounded nations.
All the Western nations, and some few of the Eastern, were represented.
Well, Friday, and what does your nation do with the men they take?
At last says he, "Me see such boat like come to place at my nation.
This observation of mine put a great many thoughts into me, which made me at first not so easy about my new man Friday as I was before; and I made no doubt but that, if Friday could get back to his own nation again, he would not only forget all his religion but all his obligation to me, and would be forward enough to give his countrymen an account of me, and come back, perhaps with a hundred or two of them, and make a feast upon me, at which he might be as merry as he used to be with those of his enemies when they were taken in war.
The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States are parts of one consistent whole, founded upon one and the same theory of government, then new in practice, though not as a theory, for it had been working itself into the mind of man for many ages, and had been especially expounded in the writings of Locke, though it had never before been adopted by a great nation in practice.
The revolutions of time furnish no previous example of a nation shooting up to maturity and expanding into greatness with the rapidity which has characterized the growth of the American people.
I say adversaries, for on recalling such proud memories we should avoid the word "enemies," whose hostile sound perpetuates the antagonisms and strife of nations, so irremediable perhaps, so fateful - and also so vain.