my God


Also found in: Wikipedia.

(oh) (my) God!

An exclamation of surprise, alarm, dismay, annoyance, or exasperation. My God, look at the time! How is it nearly midnight already? God, Bill! Would it kill you to take out the trash once in a while? Oh my God! That cyclist nearly hit me!

my God

An interjection denoting shock, distress, or surprise. My God, that car almost ran off the side of the road! My God, is that you, James? I haven't seen you in 20 years!
See also: god

my God

Also, my goodness. Expressions of shock, surprise, or dismay, as in My God, don't tell me he's dying, or My goodness, what an awful outfit. The first term dates from about 1800; goodness in the variant is a euphemism for God.
See also: god
References in classic literature ?
"My God!" he exclaimed, "thy vengeance is sometimes delayed, but only that it may fall the more effectually." Ali looked at his master for further instructions.
Caderousse, who had raised himself on his knees, and stretched out his arm, tried to draw back, then clasping his hands, and raising them with a desperate effort, "O my God, my God!" said he, "pardon me for having denied thee; thou dost exist, thou art indeed man's father in heaven, and his judge on earth.
In black distress, I called my God, When I could scarce believe him mine, He bowed his ear to my complaints -- No more the whale did me confine.
and would'st be thought my God; And storm'st, refused, thinking to terrify Me to thy will!
This prayer, says the author of Hebrews, was offered up "with loud cries and tears." Further, Jesus' cry from the cross, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (Mark 15:36) takes up the desperate cry of abandonment from a sufferer out of the past.
A professional soldier, General Boykin had taken up with a small group called the Faith Force Multiplier whose members apply military principles to evangelism with a manifesto summoning warriors "to the spiritual warfare for souls." After Boykin had led Americans in a battle against a Somalian warlord he announced, "I know my God was bigger than his.
"My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" (15:34) "My" Son; "my" God.
It may be that the future of my God relationship isn't very bright -- that remains to be seen.
We can just imagine Mary's thoughts: "Oh, my God, what is he up to now!
And what about Christ's cry from the crossess, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me" (Mark 15:34)?
A pastor friend of mine preached a Good Friday sermon a couple of years ago that focused on Jesus' words from the cross as recorded in Mark, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?" This pastor lifted up those people in the world today who may say the very same words: those stricken with poverty in Africa, those living with terminal illnesses, those living in fear or loneliness.
"What then do I love when I love my God?" I love this question because it assumes that, of course, one loves God.
Imagine the excitement of Mary's "Rabbunni!" as she recognizes the risen Jesus in the person she thought was the gardener and in the "My Lord and my God" in the formerly doubting, now believing Thomas.
The first article in the Creed, according to Luther's Large Catechism, answers the question, "What kind of a god have you?" A child could answer: "First, my God is the Father, who made heaven and earth.