muster


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pass muster

To be accepted as adequate; to meet the minimum or standard requirement. I gave the interview my best, but I guess I didn't pass muster. There are so many typos and structural problems—there's no way this report will pass muster with the boss.
See also: muster, pass

muster in

1. To enlist oneself in the military. All the young men my age were mustering in to join the war, but I had to remain behind because of my crippled leg.
2. To enlist someone else in the military. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "muster" and "in." The sergeant went to high schools around the country trying to muster in young men and women. They threatened to muster Daniel in if he didn't improve his grades and clean up his act.
See also: muster

muster out

1. To leave or resign from the military. My father served in the Marines for twenty years before mustering out in 1993.
2. To discharge someone from the military. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "muster" and "out." He sued the Navy after he was mustered out in the late 80's for his sexual orientation. They threatened to muster him out if he revealed the information to the public.
See also: muster, out

muster up

To summon, gather, or cobble something together. Said especially of intangible qualities, such as courage, determination, etc. Eventually I mustered up the courage to go over and ask him for his phone number. Despite outperforming the other team for most of the game, they were only able to muster up a single goal. Can you muster the strength up to walk back to camp, or should I go for help?
See also: muster, up

muster out of something

to be discharged from military service. He mustered out of the service before his time was up. I want to know how I can muster out too.
See also: muster, of, out

muster something up

to call up some quality, such as courage. Do you think you can muster enough courage up to do the job? Can you muster up enough strength to do the job?
See also: muster, up

pass muster

Fig. to measure up to the required standards. I tried, but my efforts didn't pass muster. If you don't wear a jacket and tie, you won't pass muster at that fancy restaurant. They won't let you in.
See also: muster, pass

muster in

Enlist in military service. For example, They were mustered in at Fort Dix. The antonym is muster out, meaning "to leave or be discharged from military service," as in He was mustered out and given a dishonorable discharge. [First half of 1800s]
See also: muster

pass muster

Meet a required standard, as in That yard cleanup won't pass muster with Mom. This expression originally meant "to undergo a military review without censure," muster referring to an assembling of troops for inspection or a similar purpose. [Late 1500s]
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

FORMAL
COMMON If someone or something passes muster, they are of a satisfactory standard for a particular purpose or job. He spoke French and Spanish and could just about pass muster in Italian. It is the only country that has yet to fulfill all the membership requirements, but it is expected to pass muster soon. Note: In the army and navy, a `muster' is an inspection of the soldiers' or sailors' uniforms and equipment.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

be accepted as adequate or satisfactory.
This was originally a military expression, meaning ‘come through a review or inspection without censure’. It is found earlier (late 16th century to late 17th century) in the now obsolete form pass (the ) musters and has been in figurative use since the late 16th century.
See also: muster, pass

pass ˈmuster

be good enough; be acceptable: I didn’t think Charlie’s parents would like me, but evidently I pass muster. Muster is the calling together of soldiers, sailors, etc. for inspection. If you pass muster, you pass the inspection without criticism.
See also: muster, pass

muster in

v.
1. To enlist someone in military service. Used chiefly in the passive: Once the men were mustered in, they got their heads shaved.
2. To enlist in military service: In the US, you can't officially muster in until you're 18 years old.
See also: muster

muster out

v.
1. To discharge someone from military service. Used chiefly in the passive: The last of the soldiers who fought in that battle were mustered out last week.
2. To be discharged from military service: I mustered out last month, and I'm proud that I had the chance to serve my country.
See also: muster, out

muster up

v.
To gather up some force of will to do something: I couldn't muster up the courage to tell them about my terrible mistake. Although the team lost, they mustered some good cheer up and went to the party.
See also: muster, up

pass muster

To be judged as acceptable.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster

To pass an examination or inspection; measure up to a given standard.
See also: muster, pass

pass muster, to

To meet a required standard. This term originated in the military and once meant to undergo review without censure. George Gascoigne used it figuratively in 1575: “The latter verse is neither true nor pleasant, and the first verse may pass the musters” (The Making of Verse). It was a cliché by the time Jonathan Swift included it in Polite Conversation (1738), and it remains current.
See also: pass
References in periodicals archive ?
"Wednesday 19th a Fine day a Cloudy a Afternoon gave Franklin Keyes a small job of shoveling gravel a Abijah Greenwood here from Hubbardston a makes some judicious observations a Muster at Fitchburg.
Ivanisevic, Muster and Becker were only some of the star names on show.
According to him, the classical approach that has been adopted in the offshore environment has been to bring personnel to a designated muster point, and then manually correlate who has arrived against a checklist or a T-card system.
That's because the great Muster himself is making a remarkable return to the ATP Tour at the age of 43, facing Ernests Gulbis in the first round.
The pirate muster also includes a treasure trail, music, comedy and maritime mayhem with a full Pirate Battle from 3pm to 4pm.
The police moved into it in 1941 when it became their muster rooms.
It was only good enough to put the Hertfordshire-based pro into joint 20th spot at Sherry Golf Club, in Jerez, as he could only muster a four-over 76 on the opening day.
The Georgian Fair and a Napoleonic Muster attracted crowds of all ages to Beamish Museum in Durham.
Navy Personnel Command (PERS 493) is conducting a mandatory muster of select Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) members, both officers and enlisted, during the summer of 2007 at Navy Operational Support Centers (NOSC) nationwide.
But a similar motorized refuge owned by one of Burke's competitors, Wally Zack of Borderline Sports Pub, did pass muster." The vehicle is licensed and insured," Zack told the Canadian Press, "and I drive it every day."
(16.) Talon J, Horvath CM, Polley R, Basler CF, Muster T, Palese P, et al.
The Journal de la Timorie, or Helmsman's Log, from the ship Mont Blanc was caught up in the ship's muster roll stored at the National Archives in Kew.
Since Lily was unable to muster up any enthusiasm for such an undertaking, she is resigned to staying at home.
Jeb Bush's Florida Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) fails to pass constitutional muster.
Add into the mix that the forecast called for rain, and I was hard pressed to get anyone to come along--after a dozen or so calls, I could only muster up two people to ride with me: Northwest concrete ripper Brent Atchley and my roommate Matt "I can only do inverts" Limo.