muddle through (something)

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muddle through (something)

To do a particular task with difficulty. I muddled through that job interview because I was sick with a cold at the time.
See also: muddle, through

muddle through (something)

to manage to get through something awkwardly. We hadn't practiced the song enough, so we just muddled through it. We didn't know what we were meant to do, so we muddled through.
See also: muddle, through

muddle through

Blunder through something, manage but awkwardly, as in The choir never knows how to line up, but we muddle through somehow. [Early 1900s]
See also: muddle, through

muddle through

v.
To do some task poorly or without strong motivation: I forgot the cookbook, so we just muddled through the recipe without it.
See also: muddle, through
References in periodicals archive ?
As one looks at the patchwork quilt that the region around us resembles, one cannot but have the queasy feeling that the only answer to the problems faced by all states therein may well lie in somehow mastering the coarse art of muddling through.
The transition from the aforementioned premise to the 'art of muddling through' is but one small step.
One had long thought that we in the Land of the Pure hadn't quite mastered the art of muddling through. Time and again our governments and our leaders had come to grief on issues that were susceptible to muddling through if only they had honed the art betimes.
Instead of glibly muddling through as is the wont of established practitioners, we often find our mandarins bogged down in their own verbiage.
So we just have to fall back on the great British tradition of muddling through, even if we don't know where we're muddling to.
AS one looks at the patchwork quilt that the region around us resembles, one cannot but have the queasy feeling that the only answer to the problems faced by all states therein would lie in somehow mastering the coarse art of muddling through. A cursory glance at the recorded history of civilisation will make it evident that inter-state affairs have more often been governed by expediency rather than ethics.
Having seen the shenanigans of some of our political luminaries over the recent past, one has little hesitation in admitting that one had underestimated their expertise in the age old game of muddling through. If anything, our chaps appear to have left the more experienced aliens far behind.