muddle

(redirected from muddling)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

muddled (up)

Drunk. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You were really muddled up!
See also: muddle

muddle through (something)

To do a particular task with difficulty. I muddled through that job interview because I was sick with a cold at the time.
See also: muddle, through

muddle on

To attempt to proceed or continue doing something despite being unprepared or lacking the required skills, organization, resources, etc. I forgot my notes for the presentation, so I just had to muddle on off the top of my head. The company fell into disarray after the CEO was arrested, but we've been muddling on ever since.
See also: muddle, on

muddle along

To attempt to proceed or continue doing something despite being unprepared or lacking the required skills, organization, resources, etc. I forgot my notes for the presentation, so I just had to muddle along off the top of my head. The company fell into disarray after the CEO was arrested, but we've been muddling along ever since.
See also: muddle

muddle about

1. To move or hang about languidly, idly, or lazily. My brother was supposed to be at work, but I found him muddling about down by the river with a friend of his. Once you get the ball, you can't just muddle about behind your offensive line—you've got to act quickly, or those linebackers are going to tackle you!
2. To work or perform in a very mediocre, ineffectual, or unsuccessful manner; to fail to perform to the best of one's abilities. You were such a bright student and talented writer—it kills me to see you muddling about in some office job. The economy had a brief surge after the election, but it has been muddling about at a flat level for the last several months.
3. To dabble in something; to do something sporadically or experimentally. I've been muddling about with different writing styles, trying to find one that suits the stories I'm trying to tell. They haven't changed the core design of the car in decades, only ever muddling about with minor details like the wing mirrors or bumpers.
4. To fumble around awkwardly or clumsily. I didn't want to wake anyone up by turning on the lights, so I had to muddle about in the dark when I came home. I hate muddling about with touch screens—I miss having cell phones with actual buttons you had to press!
See also: muddle

muddle around

1. To move or hang about languidly, idly, or lazily. My brother was supposed to be at work, but I found him muddling around down by the river with a friend of his. Once you get the ball, you can't just muddle around behind your offensive line—you've got to act quickly, or those linebackers are going to tackle you!
2. To work or perform in a very mediocre, ineffectual, or unsuccessful manner; to fail to perform to the best of one's abilities. You were such a bright student and talented writer—it kills me to see you muddling around in some office job. The economy had a brief surge after the election, but it has been muddling around at a flat level for the last several months.
3. To dabble in something; to do something sporadically or experimentally. I've been muddling around with different writing styles, trying to find one that suits the stories I'm trying to tell. They haven't changed the core design of the car in decades, only ever muddling around with minor details like the wing mirrors or bumpers.
4. To fumble around awkwardly or clumsily. I didn't want to wake anyone up by turning on the lights, so I had to muddle around in the dark when I came home. I hate muddling around with touch screens—I miss having cell phones with actual buttons you had to press!
See also: around, muddle

muddle up

1. To render something awkward, confusing, and disorderly; to obscure or obfuscate something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "muddle" and "up"; often used in passive constructions. The introduction of new tariffs is likely to further muddle up the already complicated relationship between the two countries. They muddled the contract up with all sorts of misleading, cryptic language. Our roles within the team have become so muddled up that we've largely given up the idea of job titles.
2. To mix something up (with something else). A noun or pronoun can be used between "muddle" and "up"; often used in passive constructions. They look so alike that I always muddle up their names up when I see them. I must have muddled the data points up when I was entering them into the system.
See also: muddle, up

muddle along

to progress in confusion; to continue awkwardly. I will just have to muddle along as best I can until things get straightened out. The project muddled along until the new manager got hold of it.
See also: muddle

muddle around

to work inefficiently. I can't get anything done today. I'm just muddling around. Jed is not doing his job well. He is muddling around and getting nothing done.
See also: around, muddle

muddle something up

to mix something up; to make something confusing. You really muddled the language of this contract up. Who muddled up the wording?
See also: muddle, up

muddle through (something)

to manage to get through something awkwardly. We hadn't practiced the song enough, so we just muddled through it. We didn't know what we were meant to do, so we muddled through.
See also: muddle, through

muddled (up)

intoxicated. I've had a little too much muddler, I think. Anyway, I'm muddled. Larry is too muddled up to drive.
See also: muddle

muddle through

Blunder through something, manage but awkwardly, as in The choir never knows how to line up, but we muddle through somehow. [Early 1900s]
See also: muddle, through

muddle through

v.
To do some task poorly or without strong motivation: I forgot the cookbook, so we just muddled through the recipe without it.
See also: muddle, through

muddled (up)

mod. alcohol intoxicated. I’ve had a little too much muddler, I think. Anyway, I’m muddled.
See also: muddle, up

muddled

verb
See also: muddle
References in periodicals archive ?
Muddling through policy follows that same approach.
A second reason that I believe the economics profession is ripe to accept a muddling through approach to policy is the technological change that has occurred in the analytic and computing methods available to economists.
Thus, the strongest reason for my belief that the future will involve muddling through is that advances in computing power involve a fundamental change in technology that is reducing the value of deductive theory.
In the muddling through approach that I advocate, one begins with a problem to be solved, not a theory.
Initially, the changes in policy analysis associated with muddling through will come slowly and will be appended to existing thinking.
21) Policy analysis will require muddling through as best one can using the technical tools available.
Parts of this paper come from early drafts of a book I am currently working on with William Brock entitled The Economics of Muddling Through (Colander and Brock, forthcoming).
Economists in actual line positions in government, business, and policy institutes generally recognize that policy involves muddling through.
21) In the muddling through approach that I have been advocating (Brock and Colander (2000)), we argue that an important limitation on policy is policy makers' ability to understand the effects of any policy in a complex system.
Complexity, Pedagogy, and the Economics of Muddling Through" in Salizar (ed) The Economics of Complexity.