mow the/(one's) lawn

(redirected from mow his lawn)

lawn

slang Marijuana, especially when it is of particularly low quality. Back home, you could only ever buy a bag of lawn, and you'd still be paying top dollar.

mow the/(one's) lawn

1. Literally, to cut the grass in one's lawn or yard using a mower. I need to go mow the lawn before it starts to rain.
2. slang To comb one's hair. Go mow your lawn before church.
3. slang To smoke marijuana. Just tell your parents you're going to mow the lawn with us—they won't know what you mean.
See also: lawn, mow

lawn

n. poor quality marijuana. (Drugs.) This isn’t good grass; it’s lawn.

mow one’s lawn

verb
See also: lawn, mow

mow the lawn

and mow one’s lawn
tv. to comb one’s hair. I’ll be with you as soon as I mow the lawn. Don’t you think you better mow your lawn?
See also: lawn, mow
References in periodicals archive ?
The male driver asked the juvenile to mow his lawn and invited the juvenile into the vehicle.
Inventive Jack Gamesby created his special 'coupling' contraption, which allows him to mow his lawn while sitting in his buggy.
The elderly man had gone for his daily walk at about 1pm on Friday near his home in Mitchell Road, Bedworth, when he was stopped by a stranger who offered to give him a lift home in his car and then offered to mow his lawn for him.
Details of his life are scant, but in 1952 he had a minor hit with the then controversial blues song "I'm a Doggy," and he is said to have reached the charts in Nigeria the same year with "Pancakes." (Both are included in this collection.) After Pontiac fell out with his label, he refused to sign with another record company unless its president would visit his house in Slidell, Louisiana, and mow his lawn. End of recording career.
Suppose that Smith, an ordinary mortal, knows at [t.sub.1] that Jones will mow his lawn at [t.sub.3].
(F1) God knows at [t.sub.1] that Jones will mow his lawn at [t.sub.3]
(F2) God believes at [t.sub.1] that Jones will mow his lawn at [t.sub.3].
Now if God is also essentially inerrant, as set forth in (K2), then (F2) entails that Jones will mow his lawn at [t.sub.3], thus satisfying condition (i).
(F3) God possesses at [t.sub.1] a disposition to believe that Jones will mow his lawn at [t.sub.3].
(F4) God possesses at [t.sub.1] an infallible capacity for anticipating whether Jones will mow his lawn at [t.sub.3],
Unlike the "hard-hearted" soft facts that Fischer apparently had in mind, (F4) does not entail the future event: it is neutral on the question whether Jones will mow his lawn at [t.sub.3].
Of course, DOS recognizes (indeed, it stipulates) that God does not hold an occurrent belief that Jones will (freely) mow his lawn at [t.sub.3]; its claim is rather that God may hold a nonoccurrent belief that Jones will mow at [t.sub.3].
If God is to hold a (dispositional) belief that Jones will mow his lawn at [t.sub.3], it must be the case that
(F3)" God possesses at [t.sub.1] a disposition to believe that Jones will mow his lawn at [t.sub.3], which disposition is exercisable by God's accessing at [t.sub.1] some external state (the state of affairs consisting of Jones's mowing his lawn at [t.sub.3]) that does not obtain until after [t.sub.1] and which represents Jones's mowing his lawn at [t.sub.3].(22)