move back

(redirected from moving us back)

move back

1. To move backward; to recede or retreat (away from someone or something). We all moved back when we realized the bear was alive. Kids, move back! That snake is dangerous.
2. To cause or compel someone or something to move backward or away from someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "move" and "back." Police officers moved the crowd of people back from the scene of the crime. Would you move the TV back a ways? It's a little too close to the sofa.
3. To return to a previous location or position. I changed seats to be next to my friend during the play, but I moved back when an usher came and scolded me. The lever has a spring inside of it, so it will move back as soon as you let go.
4. To cause or compel someone or something to return to a previous location or position. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "move" and "back." Be sure to move the furniture back after you're done painting the walls. I tried sneaking to a seat in the back of the class so I could my book, but the teacher caught me and moved me back.
See also: back, move

move someone or something back (from someone or something)

to cause someone or something to move back and away from someone or something. Please move your child back from the lawn mower. Move everyone back from the street.
See also: back, move

move back (from someone or something)

to move back and away. (Often a command.) Please move back from the edge. Please move back!
See also: back, move
References in periodicals archive ?
Trump specifically called on the NRA to help usher through this nomination--indicates how important he could prove in moving us back towards a less radical, more pro-gun court.
"But I've had some good results there over the years and there's no hiding from the fact that we need a win tomorrow to start moving us back up the table."
Loyalty to Oregon - "I'm a Duck" - and a quest for parking privileges motivated Stovall to buy club seats, though of the parking he said, "If they keep moving us back, we're going to be in Springfield." (Indeed, he's found out he doesn't have a guaranteed spot.)
Then in a brief presentation of Greenberg and Wollheim, both mistaking an aesthetic strand in experience for the whole of our experience of art, Schier asserts what he calls his "aesthetic of agency", moving us back to intention as a basic presentation of the work of art.