move to


Also found in: Legal.

move to

1. To relocate to some different position, area, location, etc. We moved to the back of the room while the teacher performed the demonstration. The passengers moved to the railings on the deck as the boat pulled out from the pier.
2. To cause or compel someone or something to relocate to some different position, area, location, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "move" and "to." Move these boxes to the loading dock so our delivery man knows to pick them up later. The guards moved the prisoners to the yard outside.
3. To take up residence in some different area, town, city, state, country, etc. I'm moving to Seattle next month to start my master's degree. Sarah doesn't work here anymore—she moved to Japan a few months ago.
4. To cause or compel someone or something to take up residence in some different area, town, city, state, country, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "move" and "to." His bosses want to move him to New York so that he's closer to company headquarters. We're moving the business to a bigger office across town.
See also: move

move someone or something to something

to make someone or something shift toward something. Can you move your foot to the right a little? Would you move yourself to the right?
See also: move

move to some place

to move one's household to some place, perhaps permanently. When we retired, we moved to Arizona. I hope we can move to a larger house.
See also: move, place
References in periodicals archive ?
You move to get a clear angle of attack, repositioning to engage the threat without risking injury to family, bystanders or the possibility of shooting into the neighbor's house.
Some teams will try to force the player with the ball to move to the touchline.
After experiencing all these possibilities, everyone was free to move to any of them, even to change from one to another.
Worse are the long term impacts, the cynicism that can come about when a move to an open plan office is poorly reasoned or mishandled.
Army's SDDC assets will move to the 'Van Ghentkazerne' in Rotterdam.
There is, thus, no body that moves upward and if there is one that moves upward by force, another body will, by necessity, move to its place naturally and that would create inconsistency.
MoveForFree.com provides a free local move to any resident who registers and finds an apartment through MoveForFree.com's online searchable database of properties.
DK: Merial's move to the Atlanta area is part of a global initiative to maximize Merial's effectiveness and strengthen its position as the world's leading animal health company.
Do I have my tickets?" As long as that mind--skittish, superficial, obsessive--is dominating, we never move to the deeper realms of the soul.
The cleverness is in the redundancy: if one path (spoke) is down or busy, the edge request can move to another edge server and then use its spoke to connect to the server at the hub.
If a MAF deserts, is imprisoned or dies while on active duty, a permanent change of station for the spouse or dependent includes a move to the place of enlistment or to his member's, his spouse's or dependent's home of record or nearer point in the U.S.
However, I found the move to Windows was not only painless but also enjoyable because of the flexibility it introduced.
The company attributed this move to increased costs in all key raw materials including catalysts, polyols, TDI, MDI, and CFCs over the last couple of months.
We were ordered to move to an assembly area on the Saudi-Iragi border about the time that air operations began against Iraq.
1 : the action of changing position, place, or residence <a sudden move> <We're excited about our move to a new state.>