move in

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move in

1. To move one's things into a particular location so as to make it one's new residence or place of business. I heard Janet and Sarah are moving in together. I bet it won't be long before they get married! A: "Is that office space still available to rent?" B: "Sure, when can you move in?"
2. To situate someone or something in a particular place, often a new residence or place of business. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "move" and "in." We're actually moving in our daughter to her new dorm that weekend. She'll be a sophomore in college, can you believe it? Move that plant in—it'll look much better in this room.
See also: move
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

move in (to something)

 
1. Lit. [for someone] to come to reside in something or some place. I moved into a new apartment last week. When did the new family move in?
2. Lit. to enter something or some place. The whole party moved into the house when it started raining. All the children just moved in and brought the party with them.
3. Fig. to begin a new line of activity. After failing at real estate, he moved into house painting. It looked like he could make some money, so he moved into the stock market with his assets.
See also: move

move in

 (on someone or something)
1. Lit. to move closer to someone or something; to make advances or aggressive movements toward someone or something. (See also move in (on someone).) The crowd moved in on the frightened guard. They moved in slowly.
2. Fig. to attempt to take over or dominate someone or something. The police moved in on the drug dealers. Max tried to move in on the rival gang's territory.
See also: move

move in

 (to something)
1. Lit. [for someone] to come to reside in something or some place. I moved into a new apartment last week. When did the new family move in?
2. Lit. to enter something or some place. The whole party moved into the house when it started raining. All the children just moved in and brought the party with them.
3. Fig. to begin a new line of activity. After failing at real estate, he moved into house painting. It looked like he could make some money, so he moved into the stock market with his assets.
See also: move
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

move in

1. Begin to occupy a residence or working place, as in We are scheduled to move in next month, or Helen is moving in with her sister. [Late 1800s]
2. move in on. Intrude on; also, try to take over or get control of. For example, Their sales force is moving in on our territory, or The police moved in on the gang. [Mid-1900s]
See also: move
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

move in

v.
1. To come nearer or encroach: The soldiers slowly moved in on the enemy's fort. I think it will rain—I see dark clouds moving in.
2. To begin to occupy a residence or place of business: We bought the house last week, but we won't move in until next month.
See also: move
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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