move along


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move along

1. To begin or continue to advance forward. Said especially as a command. Let's move along before the police show up! Move along, everyone—this conversation is no one's business but ours.
2. To instruct, direct, or compel someone to advance forward. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used before or after "along." The police finally showed up to move along the crowd of onlookers. I'm sorry, ma'am, but I need to move you along—your car is blocking access to this alley.
See also: move

move along

to continue to move; to start moving out of the way. (Often a command.) The crowd moved along slowly. Please just move along. There is nothing to see here.
See also: move
References in periodicals archive ?
It also moves along with or without you, so if you fail to make a decision in time or explore an area fully, the plot may move along regardless.
Rizwan Naseer while reviewing arrangements for providing emergency medical cover to the mourning processions, said 14 rescue mobile posts will also move along with the processions in the city.
1 : to move along with the body close to the ground or floor : move slowly on hands and knees : crawl
A magnetic field tends to disrupt superconductivity when eddies of electric current created by the magnetic field move along with the main current.
Although things move along swiftly and zany characters and situations abound, this book is ultimately not very memorable.
Penning this note for my final issue as editor of Artforum, a publication that honored me with the challenge and responsibility of my position before I had imagined such a post a possibility; that has coddled me through eleven enormously productive--and intense--years; and that has allowed me to move along on my own clock and (even more generously) on my own terms, I can say only: Thank you.
While there is, at present, neither great optimism nor demand, New Jersey's real estate market continues to move along at a steady, but not remarkable, pace.
Geological Survey: "Plates can move along, duck under, or ride over one another." And faults, or fractures caused by the shifting of rocks in Earth's crust, can create enormous stress over time.
They move along to the continuous rhythms without shaping the dance by means of dynamic phrasing or nuances of timing.
Fifteen fire vehicles and 46 mobile posts will move along processions.
1 : to move along by feeling with the hands <He groped along the dark hallway.>
By controlling the composition of the solution consuming the rotaxanes, researchers can induce each molecule's ring to move along the rod between two fixed positions.