mountain


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have a mountain to climb

To have an extremely difficult, seemingly impossible task at hand. After losing Ohio to his opponent, the president now has a mountain to climb if he wants to hold on to his job.
See also: climb, have, mountain

have snow on the mountain

To have silver, grey, or white hair on one's head, as due to aging. Sure, I may have a bit of snow on the mountain, but I still lead as adventurous a life as I ever have!
See also: have, mountain, on, snow

snow on the mountain

Silver, grey, or white hair on one's head, as due to aging. Sure, there's a bit of snow on the mountain, but I still lead as adventurous a life as I ever have!
See also: mountain, on, snow

mountain oysters

A food made from animal testicles, often those of a sheep or calf. A: "Let's get some mountain oysters!" B: "Are you sure? Did you read the description in menu?"
See also: mountain, oyster

mountain to climb

A very difficult task or challenge. You certainly have a mountain to climb if you intend to get this project done by Thursday.
See also: climb, mountain

move mountains

To do or achieve something that is incredibly difficult. I firmly believe that our faith in God can move mountains. I would move mountains to be with you.
See also: mountain, move

if the mountain will not come to Mohammed

You must change your actions accordingly if things do not proceed as you would like them to. You'll have to go woo investors if they won't come to you. If the mountain will not come to Mohammad, Mohammed must go to the mountain.
See also: come, if, Mohammed, mountain, not, will

Faith will move mountains.

Prov. If you believe in what you are doing, you can overcome any obstacle. (Sometimes refers to faith in God.) Jane's faith in her cause could move mountains. You may feel disheartened sometimes, but remember that faith will move mountains.
See also: faith, mountain, move, will

If the mountain will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the mountain.

Prov. If things do not change the way you want them to, you must adjust to the way they are. (Mohammed is often used instead of Mahomet. Also the mountain has come to Mahomet, something or someone that you would not expect to travel has arrived. There are many variations of this proverb. See the examples.) The president won't see me so I will have to go to his office. If the mountain will not come to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the mountain. If Caroline can't leave the hospital on her birthday, we'll have to take her birthday party to the hospital. If the mountain won't come to Mahomet, Mahomet will have to go to the mountain. It's true I don't usually leave my home, but if you can't come to see me, I'll have to come see you. The mountain will come to Mohammed.
See also: come, if, Mahomet, mountain, must, not, will

make a mountain out of a molehill

Cliché to make a major issue out of a minor one; to exaggerate the importance of something. Come on, don't make a mountain out of a molehill. It's not that important. Mary is always making mountains out of molehills.
See also: make, mountain, of, out

if the mountain won't come to Muhammad, Muhammad must go to the mountain

If one can't have one's way, one must give in. For example, Since you can't come here for the holiday, I'll go to your house-if the mountain won't come to Muhammad, Muhammad must go to the mountain . This expression is based on a tale that Muhammad once sought proof of his teachings by ordering a mountain to come to him. When it did not move, he maintained that God had been merciful, for if it had indeed moved they all would have been crushed by it. [Late 1500s]
See also: come, if, mountain, Muhammad, must

make a mountain out of a molehill

Exaggerate trifling difficulties, as in If you forgot you racket you can borrow one-don't make a mountain out of a molehill. This expression, alluding to the barely raised tunnels created by moles, was first recorded in John Fox's The Book of Martyrs (1570).
See also: make, mountain, of, out

if Mohammed will not go to the mountain

or

the mountain must go to Mohammed

People use expressions such as if Mohammed will not go to the mountain or the mountain must go to Mohammed to say that if someone that you want to see does not come to you, you have to go to them. People, for whatever reason, are reluctant to leave their houses to vote, so if Mohammed won't go to the mountain, we have to go to them. Fifteen minutes later, Chotas walked into the office of the Prosecuting Attorney. `Well,' Demonides said. `Mohammed comes to the mountain. What can I do for you?' Note: The full expression is `if Mohammed will not go to the mountain, the mountain must go to Mohammed'. Note: These expressions are based on a story about the prophet Mohammed, who was asked to show his power by making Mount Safa come to him.
See also: if, Mohammed, mountain, not, will

make a mountain out of a molehill

If someone makes a mountain out of a molehill, they talk or complain about a small, unimportant problem as if it is important and serious. The company's CEO has blamed the media for making a mountain out of a molehill. Don't make a mountain out of a molehill — it's really not a big deal.
See also: make, mountain, of, out

a mountain to climb

mainly BRITISH
If someone has a mountain to climb, they have to do a task which will be very difficult and will involve a lot of hard work. The negotiators have a mountain to climb if they want to bring lasting peace to this region. He still has a mountain to climb in persuading the public that war is justified.
See also: climb, mountain

move mountains

If you move mountains you succeed in doing something that is very difficult and requires a lot of hard work. If you get a good team round you, you can move mountains. We should all repeat five times a day, `It is possible to change!' With this belief, you can move mountains. Note: People sometimes say that faith or love can move mountains, meaning that faith and love can be very powerful forces. Here's proof, if it were needed, that faith can move mountains. Note: This is from the proverb `Faith will move mountains', which is based on the words of Jesus to his followers in the Bible: `If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove'. (Matthew 17:20)
See also: mountain, move

have a mountain to climb

be facing a very difficult task.
See also: climb, have, mountain

make a mountain out of a molehill

foolishly or pointlessly exaggerate the importance of something trivial.
The contrast between the size of molehills and that of mountains has been made in this and related expressions since the late 16th century.
See also: make, mountain, of, out

move mountains

1 achieve spectacular and apparently impossible results. 2 make every possible effort.
In sense 1, the phrase alludes to 1 Corinthians 13:2: ‘And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries, and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing’.
See also: mountain, move

make a ˌmountain out of a ˈmolehill

(disapproving) make a small or unimportant problem seem much more serious than it really is: It’s not such a big problem! You’re making a mountain out of a molehill!
See also: make, mountain, of, out

make a mountain

and pitch a tent
n. to have a morning erection that raises the covers; to have an erection that makes a bulge in one’s clothing; to get an erection. Bobby makes a mountain almost every morning. When I was in the hospital, I was afraid I would pitch a tent in the morning.
See also: make, mountain

(mountain) dew

1. n. Scotch whiskey. The real mountain dew is smoky-tasting and amber.
2. n. illicit liquor; any liquor. Mountain dew is what I want. As long as it’s not store bought.
See also: dew, mountain

make a mountain out of a molehill

To exaggerate a minor problem.
See also: make, mountain, of, out
References in classic literature ?
The beast shied, opened its wide nostrils and tossed its mane, then rearing high up in the air, its hind feet slipped and it fell with its rider down the steep mountain side.
Then the waters of the Atlantic rushed into the interior of the mountain.
Let us now suppose the stranger to have finished his supper of bear's meat; and, by his natural felicity of manner, to have placed himself on a footing of kindness with the whole family, so that they talked as freely together as if he belonged to their mountain brood.
The influx of this wandering trade has had its effects on the habits of the mountain tribes.
Its length was about five hundred and fifty miles, and its breadth, from the mountains to the Pacific, from three hundred to three hundred and fifty geographic miles.
A mile away, a grove-plumed promontory juts far into the lake and glasses its palace in the blue depths; in midstream a boat is cutting the shining surface and leaving a long track behind, like a ray of light; the mountains beyond are veiled in a dreamy purple haze; far in the opposite direction a tumbled mass of domes and verdant slopes and valleys bars the lake, and here indeed does distance lend enchantment to the view--for on this broad canvas, sun and clouds and the richest of atmospheres have blended a thousand tints together, and over its surface the filmy lights and shadows drift, hour after hour, and glorify it with a beauty that seems reflected out of Heaven itself.
I suppose the vegetable folk were always afraid to enter this cavern because it is dark; but we have our lanterns to light the way, so I propose that we start out and discover where this tunnel in the mountain leads to.
Go up the mountain, if you dare, and find out what the First and Foremost will do to you
The spoken word had located him in the wild canyons of Sonoma Mountain and fringed the mountain with posses of peace-officers and detachments of armed farmers.
Barbicane made his companions observe that the height of this mountain above the surrounding plain was far from equaling the depth of its crater.
We may infer, from the frozen mammals and nature of the mountain vegetation, that Siberia was similarly affected.
The features in the scenery of the Andes which struck me most, as contrasted with the other mountain chains with which I am acquainted, were, -- the flat fringes sometimes expanding into narrow plains on each side of the valleys, -- the bright colours, chiefly red and purple, of the utterly bare and precipitous hills of porphyry, the grand and continuous wall-like dykes, -- the plainly- divided strata which, where nearly vertical, formed the picturesque and wild central pinnacles, but where less inclined, composed the great massive mountains on the outskirts of the range, -- and lastly, the smooth conical piles of fine and brightly coloured detritus, which sloped up at a high angle from the base of the mountains, sometimes to a height of more than 2000 feet.
Before my highest mountain do I stand, and before my longest wandering: therefore must I first go deeper down than I ever ascended:
In a thousand spots the traces of the winter avalanche may be perceived, where trees lie broken and strewed on the ground, some entirely destroyed, others bent, leaning upon the jutting rocks of the mountain or transversely upon other trees.
That's Sonoma Mountain there, and the road skirts it pretty well up, and goes through Cooper's Grove.