mother


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mother

verb

mother

1. n. marijuana. (see also mother nature(’s).) She grows her own mother in a pot in her room.
2. n. a drug dealer; one’s own drug dealer upon whom one depends. (Drugs.) If you can’t trust your mother, who can you trust?
3. Go to motherfucker (sense 3).
See:
References in classic literature ?
Hundreds of other children were christened in it also, such robes being then a rare possession, and the lending of ours among my mother's glories.
My mother lay in bed with the christening robe beside her, and I peeped in many times at the door and then went to the stair and sat on it and sobbed.
She wished for what her mother wished for, but the motives of her mother's wishes wounded her.
Her mother bore Tess no ill-will for leaving the housework to her single-handed efforts for so long; indeed, Joan seldom upbraided her thereon at any time, feeling but slightly the lack of Tess's assistance whilst her instinctive plan for relieving herself of her labours lay in postponing them.
The gate was then closed, and the girl found herself back in the old world close to her mother's house.
His mother laughed a laugh that seemed to ring through the city and be echoed and re-echoed by countless other laughs.
'And we are both widows too!' said Barbara's mother. 'We must have been made to know each other.'
My father had often hinted that she seldom conducted herself like any ordinary Christian; and now, instead of ringing the bell, she came and looked in at that identical window, pressing the end of her nose against the glass to that extent, that my poor dear mother used to say it became perfectly flat and white in a moment.
"You tell me I don't understand your mother," I said, gently.
And through it all, a flying shuttle, weaving the golden dazzling thread of personality, moved the form of her little, indomitable mother, eight years old, and nine ere the great traverse was ended, a necromancer and a law-giver, willing her way, and the way and the willing always good and right.
How soon -- with what strange rapidity, indeed did Pearl arrive at an age that was capable of social intercourse beyond the mother's ever-ready smile and nonsense-words!
The boy's answer reminded me of that other little girl whom my mother had once seen.
As Amy pointed to the smiling Christ child on his Mother's knee, Mrs.
"Well, but what makes thee think so, Mother? What's put it into thy head?"
As she entered the ballroom her father was hurriedly coming out of her mother's room.