most


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at the most

1. No more or greater than the amount stated. I think we should just book the tickets. If we buy them now, they'll only cost us a few hundred dollars at the most.
2. No greater or more extreme than is stated or suggested. I wouldn't worry too much about the charges. At the most, they'll make you do some community service or pay a fine.
See also: most

the most unkindest cut of all

The most hurtful or malicious thing that one could say to another. The phrase originated in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar in a description of Caesar's murder. Hearing my own mother attack my decision to adopt a child was the most unkindest cut of all.
See also: all, cut, most, of, unkind

they that live longest see most

Older people have had a lot of life experiences. You can always learn something from your elders—they that live longest see most.
See also: live, long, most, see, that

at best

1. In the best possible scenario. At best, Doug will be only an hour late. They're only selling junk at the yard sale, so I think they'll make $10 at best.
2. Ideally suited for success. In this usage, a pronoun is used between "at" and "best." I'm not at my best when I'm tired.

at most

At the maximum. The beach really isn't far away—at most, it should take us an hour to get there. I hope you're not disappointed in your dance—I only saw two mistakes at most.
See also: most

the busiest men have the most leisure

People who finish their work quickly ultimately have more free time. A: "Tom has the highest GPA in our class, but whenever I see him, he's playing video games, not studying!" B: "I guess it's true what they say—the busiest men have the most leisure."
See also: busy, have, leisure, men, most

empty vessels make (the) most noise

Foolish, unwise, or stupid people are the most talkative. Of course silly old Aunt Helen babbles constantly—empty vessels make the most noise.
See also: empty, make, most, noise, vessel

empty vessels make the most sound

Unwise people are the most talkative. Of course silly old Aunt Helen babbles constantly—empty vessels make the most sound.
See also: empty, make, most, sound, vessel

hit (one) where it hurts (most)

To attack one in the area that is most vulnerable or that will result in the most harm. Usually does not refer to physical violence. By questioning his parenting, Gina hit ken where it hurt most. The best way to take down the cartel is to hit them where it hurts most—in their bank accounts.
See also: hit, hurt

empty vessels make (the) most sound

Foolish, unwise, or stupid people are the most talkative. Of course silly old Aunt Helen babbles constantly—empty vessels make the most sound.
See also: empty, make, most, sound, vessel

for the most part

Mostly; typically. For the most part, Paul is a good student, but he does struggle with math.
See also: most, part

at best

 and at most
in the most favorable view; in the most positive judgment; as the best one can say. At best we found their visit pleasantly short. The dinner was not at all pleasant. At best the food was not burned. At most there were three people in line ahead of me.

at one's best

 
1. and at its best to the utmost; to the highest degree possible. This restaurant serves gourmet food at its best. The singer was at her best when she performed ballads.
2. in the best of health; displaying the most civilized behavior. (Often in the negative.) He's at his best after a good nap. I'm not at my best when I'm angry.

at (the) most

no more than the amount mentioned. A: How far away is the beach? B: Ten miles at most. At the most, there were only 15 people in the audience.
See also: most

busiest men have the most leisure

 and busiest men find the most time
Prov. Industrious people get their work done efficiently and therefore have time to do what they want. Fred: How does Phil do it? He produces more than the rest of us, but he also manages to pursue all his hobbies. Alan: The busiest men have the most leisure. As the town's only doctor, Bert worked extremely hard, yet he always had time to play with his children and go out with his wife. The busiest men find the most time.
See also: busy, have, leisure, men, most

Empty vessels make the most sound.

Prov. Foolish people make the most noise. I suspect Amy is not very smart. She chatters constantly, and as they say, empty vessels make the most sound.
See also: empty, make, most, sound, vessel

First impressions are the most lasting.

Prov. People will remember the way you appear when you first meet them, so it is important to look and act your best when you meet someone for the first time. George spent two hours picking just the right clothes to wear when he met the head of the law firm, since he knew that first impressions are the most lasting.
See also: first, impression, most

firstest with the mostest

the earliest and in the largest numbers; the earliest with more of what's needed. Pete got the prize for being the firstest with the mostest. I always like to be there early—the firstest with the mostest.
See also: first, most

for the most part

mostly; in general. For the most part, the class is enjoying geometry. I like working here for the most part.
See also: most, part

get out of (doing) something

to manage not to have to do something. I was supposed to go to a wedding, but I got out of it. Jane had an appointment, but she got out of it.
See also: get, of, out

get someone or something out of someone or something

 and get someone or something out
to release or extricate someone or something from someone, something, or some place. See if you can get the cat out of this cabinet. I can't get the nail out of the board. I can get out almost anything with my pry bar.
See also: get, of, out

get something out of someone

to cause or force someone to give specific information. We will get the truth out of her yet. The detective couldn't get anything out of the suspect. They got a confession out of him by beating him.
See also: get, of, out

get something out of something

to get some kind of benefit from something. I didn't get anything out of the lecture. I'm always able to get something helpful out of our conversations.
See also: get, of, out

get the most out of someone or something

to achieve the greatest output of work, effort, production, etc., out of someone or something. I do what I can to get the most out of life. I try to get the most out of my employees.
See also: get, most, of, out

make the most of something

to make something appear as good as possible; to exploit something; to get as much out of something as is possible. Mary knows how to make the most of her talents. They designed the advertisements to make the most of the product's features.
See also: make, most, of

most of all

of greatest importance; more than any other. (Compare this with least of all.) I wanted to go to that museum most of all. Why can't I go? There are many reasons why I didn't use my car today. Most of all, it's a lovely day for walking.
See also: all, most, of

at best

Under the most favorable circumstances, as in At best we'll be just one week behind schedule, or Cleaning out the attic is a tedious job at best. This idiom, formerly also put as at the best, today is most often used in situations that are actually far from ideal, as in the examples above. [First half of 1300s] For an antonym, see at worst.

at most

Also, at the most or at the outside . At the largest amount, the furthest limit; also, in the most extreme case. For example, She'll be finished in two weeks at the most, or It'll take two weeks at the outside, or At most the chef uses a tiny bit of pepper. The terms with most date from the 1300s; at the outside from the mid-1800s. Also see at best.
See also: most

at the most

see under at most.
See also: most

for the most part

In general, usually. For example, For the most part she is very good-humored, or The committee members agree for the most part. [Late 1300s] Also see the synonyms by and large; on the whole.
See also: most, part

get out of

1. Emerge or escape from, as in I hate to get out of bed on cold mornings or He'll be lucky to get out of this mess. [First half of 1500s] Also see get out, def. 1.
2. Go beyond, as in The cat had climbed into the tree; she'd gotten well out of my reach. [First half of 1600s] Also see out of control; out of sight.
3. Evade or avoid, as in He tried to get out of answering their questions, or Please get out of the way so we can pass. [Late 1800s] Also see out of the way.
4. Elicit or draw out something from someone. For example, I can't get a straight answer out of him, or Getting a contribution out of her is like pulling teeth. [First half of 1600s]
5. Get rid of something, remove, as in Get these cats out of the house, or I can't get this melody out of my head. Also see out of one's system.
6. Extract from, obtain from. For example, You can get a lot of juice out of these oranges, or She got little or nothing out of this investment. It is also put as get the most out of, meaning "use to the greatest advantage," as in He gets the most out of his staff. [Second half of 1600s] Also see get a bang out of; get a rise out of; get mileage out of.
See also: get, of, out

make the most of

Use to the greatest advantage, as in She planned to make the most of her trip to Europe, or The class quickly made the most of the teacher's absence. This expression was first recorded in 1526.
See also: make, most, of

empty vessels make the most sound

or

empty vessels make the most noise

OLD-FASHIONED
People say empty vessels make the most sound or empty vessels make the most noise to mean that people who talk a lot and give their opinions a lot are often not very intelligent or talented. There's a lot of truth in that old saying, `Empty vessels make the most sound'. Those who are actually content with their choices are not usually interested in telling the rest of us about them. Note: People like this can be called empty vessels. These `experts' who talk a lot but actually say nothing have been shown up for the empty vessels they are. Note: A vessel is a container such as a jug, pot or jar.
See also: empty, make, most, sound, vessel

empty vessels make most noise (or sound)

those with least wisdom or knowledge are always the most talkative. proverb
Vessel here refers to a hollow container, such as a bowl or cask, rather than a ship.
See also: empty, make, most, noise, vessel

make the ˈmost of something

get as much good as you can out of something: The meeting finished early so I decided to make the most of being in London and do some shopping.The opportunity won’t come again so make the most of it now.
See also: make, most, of, something

make the ˈmost of yourself, himself, etc.

look as attractive as possible: She’s a pretty girl but she doesn’t make the most of herself.
See also: make, most, of

at (the) ˈmost

not more than this amount; as a maximum: I’ll be away for a week, or perhaps ten days at the most.There were 50 people there at the very most. OPPOSITE: at least
See also: most

for the ˈmost part

mainly; on the whole; generally: I agree with you for the most part but there are a few details I’d like to discuss further.
See also: most, part

the firstest with the mostest

mod. the earliest and in the largest numbers; the earliest with more of what’s needed. Pete got the prize for being the firstest with the mostest.
See also: first, most

the most

n. something that is the best. This noodle stuff is the most, Mom!
See also: most

at best

1. Interpreted most favorably; at the most: no more than 40 people at best in attendance.
2. Under the most favorable conditions: has a top speed of 20 miles per hour at best.

make the most of

To use to the greatest advantage.
See also: make, most, of

at (the) most

At the maximum: We saw him for ten minutes at the most. She ran two miles at most.
See also: most

for the most part

To the greater extent; generally or mostly.
See also: most, part