moss

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Related to mosses: Moses

curly dirt

Clumps of dust. Please dust this room, and be sure to get the curly dirt that's gathered under the couch.
See also: curly, dirt

rolling stone

A person who wanders or travels often and at length, without settling down for any significant period of time. Based on the proverb "a rolling stone gathers no moss." I never knew my father very well. He became a bit of a rolling stone after my sister was born, so he'd only ever hang around for a week or two at a time.
See also: roll, stone

a rolling stone gathers no moss

A person who wanders or travels often and at length will not be burdened by attachments such as friends, family, or possessions. Can be used as a negative (to suggest that such a person won't find a fulfilling place in life) or as a positive (to suggest that they will have a more interesting and unpredictable life). I never knew my father very well. Apparently he got really restless after my sister was born, anxious not to be tied down to the one place or job, so he just started moving around the country on his own. A rolling stone gathers no moss, as they say. I was just so eager to get out there and see the world, living in as many countries and trying as many new things as possible. A rolling stone gathers no moss, and I felt allergic to moss at the time.
See also: gather, moss, no, roll, stone

house moss

Bits of lint. Leave it to Grandma to spot every bit of house moss we missed in our cleaning.
See also: house, moss

curly dirt

 and house moss; slut's wool
puffs of dirt and dust. How long has it been since you swept under this bed? There's a mountain of curly dirt under here! No one's been in this room for an age. Look at all the cobwebs and curly dirt. She was a terrible housekeeper. House moss collected in all the corners of her rooms.
See also: curly, dirt

rolling stone gathers no moss

Prov. A person who does not settle down is not attached to anything or anyone. (Can be said in admiration or in censure, depending on whether or not the speaker feels it is good to be attached to something or someone.) I worry about Tom. He's never lived in the same place for two years in a row, and he keeps changing jobs. A rolling stone gathers no moss.
See also: gather, moss, no, roll, stone

rolling stone

A person who moves about a great deal and never settles down, as in Kate's lived in ten cities in as many years-she's a real rolling stone. This expression is a shortening of the proverb a rolling stone gathers no moss, first recorded in 1523, which indicates that one who never settles anywhere will not do well. After some 300 years of this interpretation, in the mid-1800s the value of gathering moss (and staying put) began to be questioned, and in current usage the term is most often used without any particular value judgment.
See also: roll, stone

a rolling stone gathers no moss

People say a rolling stone gathers no moss meaning that if a person keeps moving from one place to another, they will not get many friends or possessions. I'm saying that it's not a good idea to get too settled — a rolling stone gathers no moss. Note: You can call a person who does not stay in one place for long a rolling stone. I guess you could call me a rolling stone. My home is out on the waves. Note: Some people use this proverb to say that it is a bad thing to keep moving like this, and it is better to be settled. Other people use this proverb to suggest that it is a good thing to keep moving and changing, and not stay in one place.
See also: gather, moss, no, roll, stone

house moss

n. little blobs of lint. (see also ghost turd.) There is some house moss under the sofa.
See also: house, moss

rolling stone gathers no moss, a

Someone who keeps moving and changing will not settle down and progress. This ancient proverb, first stated in this form by Erasmus in Adagia (1523), appears in numerous languages. For the first three hundred years or so it was nearly always voiced as a kind of reprimand to those who would not settle down and make good. By the mid-nineteenth century, however, the validity of this sentiment was being questioned. In Edward B. Ramsay’s Reminiscences of Scottish Life (1858) a character replied to this adage, “Ay, but can ye tell me what guid the fog [moss] does to the stane?” Shaw later wrote (Preface to Misalliance, 1914), “We keep repeating the silly proverb that rolling stones gather no moss, as if moss were a desirable parasite.” Today we may call the inveterate traveler, job-changer, or mover “a rolling stone.” The term gained further currency in the 1960s with a very popular British rock group that called itself the Rolling Stones and a popular song by Bob Dylan, “Like a Rolling Stone” (1965).
See also: gather, no, roll, stone
References in periodicals archive ?
But to value mosses in the landscape, it is essential to greet them at their level, through the lens of a botanist.
On the porch, she told us that mosses are not like other plants; they have no interior plumbing that connects the leaves to the roots, and as nonvascular plants they share (and dominate) a plant niche called the bryophytes.
Then, take a closer look at the fascinating details and differences in these tiny plants, and interact closely with them--walk barefoot on your mosses and sit down on them.
A native of Asheville, she now lives in Transylvania County where she started her own moss garden over eight years ago; her obsession with mosses has become her profession.
The soft layer of mosses houses springtails and spiders, acarids, earthworms and beetles as well as the creeping stems of the prostrate shrubs that find shelter in the moss layer from the freezing wind and from the jaws of herbivores.
This effect is so important that in the cracks and concavities, where the thickness of mosses is greater, the soil does not become completely thawed until the end of summer, so it is only unfrozen for two or three weeks a year.
There are many reasons to grow mosses: They stand up to foot traffic and make a pretty substitute for lawn where grass is difficult to grow.
Beginning this year with my order of a small quantity of three different mosses, I'm only starting to dabble in mosses.
"You need trees that are large enough and old enough to start accumulating mosses before you can have the cyanobacteria that are associated with the mosses," said Dr.
For some male-female pairs, the researchers dropped in several members of an arthropod species commonly found living with wild mosses, either the springtail Isotoma caerulea or the mite Scutovertex minutus.
Rather, mosses recovered from archaeological sites tend to have been used for stuffing, wiping and wrapping.
The club mosses' internal hydraulic systems raise water centimeters above the roots and also distribute sugars produced in the sun-catching greenery.
Mishler points out that wind dispersal works well for mosses, liverworts, and lichens because, unlike flowering plants and ferns, many can regenerate front small asexual structures or even tiny, broken-off pieces.
Calling mosses "terrestrial sponges," Klinger says they can hold enough water to "saturate the surface soils right beneath them, making that zone anaerobic (free of oxygen)." As feeder roots -- the ones that take in nutrients but have the smallest oxygen storage -- grow into that zone, they die.