moss


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curly dirt

Clumps of dust. Please dust this room, and be sure to get the curly dirt that's gathered under the couch.
See also: curly, dirt

rolling stone

A person who wanders or travels often and at length, without settling down for any significant period of time. Based on the proverb "a rolling stone gathers no moss." I never knew my father very well. He became a bit of a rolling stone after my sister was born, so he'd only ever hang around for a week or two at a time.
See also: roll, stone

a rolling stone gathers no moss

A person who wanders or travels often and at length will not be burdened by attachments such as friends, family, or possessions. Can be used as a negative (to suggest that such a person won't find a fulfilling place in life) or as a positive (to suggest that they will have a more interesting and unpredictable life). I never knew my father very well. Apparently he got really restless after my sister was born, anxious not to be tied down to the one place or job, so he just started moving around the country on his own. A rolling stone gathers no moss, as they say. I was just so eager to get out there and see the world, living in as many countries and trying as many new things as possible. A rolling stone gathers no moss, and I felt allergic to moss at the time.
See also: gather, moss, no, roll, stone

house moss

Bits of lint. Leave it to Grandma to spot every bit of house moss we missed in our cleaning.
See also: house, moss

curly dirt

 and house moss; slut's wool
puffs of dirt and dust. How long has it been since you swept under this bed? There's a mountain of curly dirt under here! No one's been in this room for an age. Look at all the cobwebs and curly dirt. She was a terrible housekeeper. House moss collected in all the corners of her rooms.
See also: curly, dirt

rolling stone gathers no moss

Prov. A person who does not settle down is not attached to anything or anyone. (Can be said in admiration or in censure, depending on whether or not the speaker feels it is good to be attached to something or someone.) I worry about Tom. He's never lived in the same place for two years in a row, and he keeps changing jobs. A rolling stone gathers no moss.
See also: gather, moss, no, roll, stone

rolling stone

A person who moves about a great deal and never settles down, as in Kate's lived in ten cities in as many years-she's a real rolling stone. This expression is a shortening of the proverb a rolling stone gathers no moss, first recorded in 1523, which indicates that one who never settles anywhere will not do well. After some 300 years of this interpretation, in the mid-1800s the value of gathering moss (and staying put) began to be questioned, and in current usage the term is most often used without any particular value judgment.
See also: roll, stone

a rolling stone gathers no moss

People say a rolling stone gathers no moss meaning that if a person keeps moving from one place to another, they will not get many friends or possessions. I'm saying that it's not a good idea to get too settled — a rolling stone gathers no moss. Note: You can call a person who does not stay in one place for long a rolling stone. I guess you could call me a rolling stone. My home is out on the waves. Note: Some people use this proverb to say that it is a bad thing to keep moving like this, and it is better to be settled. Other people use this proverb to suggest that it is a good thing to keep moving and changing, and not stay in one place.
See also: gather, moss, no, roll, stone

house moss

n. little blobs of lint. (see also ghost turd.) There is some house moss under the sofa.
See also: house, moss

rolling stone gathers no moss, a

Someone who keeps moving and changing will not settle down and progress. This ancient proverb, first stated in this form by Erasmus in Adagia (1523), appears in numerous languages. For the first three hundred years or so it was nearly always voiced as a kind of reprimand to those who would not settle down and make good. By the mid-nineteenth century, however, the validity of this sentiment was being questioned. In Edward B. Ramsay’s Reminiscences of Scottish Life (1858) a character replied to this adage, “Ay, but can ye tell me what guid the fog [moss] does to the stane?” Shaw later wrote (Preface to Misalliance, 1914), “We keep repeating the silly proverb that rolling stones gather no moss, as if moss were a desirable parasite.” Today we may call the inveterate traveler, job-changer, or mover “a rolling stone.” The term gained further currency in the 1960s with a very popular British rock group that called itself the Rolling Stones and a popular song by Bob Dylan, “Like a Rolling Stone” (1965).
See also: gather, no, roll, stone
References in classic literature ?
Moss, deprecatingly; "I know there isn't a day-laborer works harder."
Moss, looking blankly before him, "we'd better be sold up, and ha' done with it; I must part wi' every head o' stock I've got, to pay you and the landlord too."
Moss as he had desired, and he was able to say angrily, rising from his seat,--
Moss, went on to the kitchen door, where the eldest boy was holding his horse, and his sister was waiting in a state of wondering alarm, which was not without its alleviations, for baby was making pleasant gurgling sounds, and performing a great deal of finger practice on the faded face.
Moss's tears came again at this unexpected kindness, and she could say nothing.
Moss, drying her tears; then turning to Lizzy, she said, "Run now, and fetch the colored egg for cousin Maggie." Lizzy ran in, and quickly reappeared with a small paper parcel.
Lizzy, a black-eyed child of seven, looked very shy when her mother drew her forward, for the small Mosses were much in awe of their uncle from Dorlcote Mill.
Tulliver's return into the yard was descried by several young Mosses, who immediately ran in with the exciting news to their mother, so that Mrs.
He followed the trail of the other man who dragged himself along, and soon came to the end of it - a few fresh-picked bones where the soggy moss was marked by the foot-pads of many wolves.
His knees had become raw meat like his feet, and though he padded them with the shirt from his back it was a red track he left behind him on the moss and stones.
Gatemore Capital - an investment firm - held 9.6 million shares in Moss Bros after the transaction, equivalent to a 9.6% stake in the company.
Surviving is her sister, Cecilia (Richard) Moss of Pana; nephews: Ronnie Moore of Assumption, Donnie (Jennifer) Moore of Assumption, Roger (Jennifer) Moss of Pana, Douglas (Cheryl) Moss of Johnsburg, and Bradley (Jayme) Moss of Indianapolis, IN.
Moss tore through Houghtonle-Spring at more than twice the legal speed limit as he tried to make his getaway.
Moss, 38 - once quizzed by police over claims he assaulted Gemma - admitted GBH and got 21 months.
Moss started in the insurance business in 1997 after working as a stock broker with a national firm.