mortal

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mere mortal

A human, and therefore capable of mistakes. The phrase emphasizes someone's humanity and fallibility. I have to make my expectations more realistic and realize that she's a mere mortal. Presidents are bound to make mistakes—they're mere mortals, just like the rest of us.
See also: mere, mortal

shuffle off

1. Literally, to leave or depart while dragging or sliding one's feet. The child shuffled off after being scolded by his parents. We all shuffled off back to our desks after the lunch break ended.
2. To leave or depart, especially slowly, gradually, or reluctantly. The party carried on into the night, and people didn't start shuffling off until nearly dawn. The student shuffled off dejectedly out of class after finding out she'd gotten a D on her test.
3. To dispose, get rid, or divest oneself of something, especially in a hasty or evasive manner. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shuffle" and "off", in which case it is usually followed by "(on)to (someone or something)." The politician has been shuffling off his investments in the company to avoid public perception of corruption. We've been shuffling these tasks off to our smaller teams to allow our bigger teams to focus on our more important projects.
4. To avoid, evade, or neglect something, especially some duty or responsibility. A noun or pronoun can be used between "shuffle" and "off", in which case it is usually followed by "(on)to (someone or something)." We all shuffled off classes for the day and took the train out to Coney Island. It came to light that Bill had been shuffling his reports off onto his secretary so that he could go out drinking.
See also: off, shuffle

shuffle off this mortal coil

To die. An allusion to a line in Shakespeare's Hamlet, in which Hamlet muses on what happens to the spirit after death. I've been giving my money away to my children over the past few years—I don't want them squabbling over it when I shuffle off this mortal coil. I heard that Jenkins shuffled off this mortal coil over the weekend.
See also: coil, mortal, off, shuffle, this
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

shuffle off this mortal coil

Euph. to die. (Often jocular or formal euphemism. Not often used in consoling someone.) Cousin Fred shuffled off this mortal coil after suffering a heart attack. When I shuffle off this mortal coil, I want to go out in stylebells, flowers, and a long, boring funeral.
See also: coil, mortal, off, shuffle, this
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

shuffle off

1. Get rid of, act evasively, as in They've tried to shuffle off public inquiries about the safety of their planes. This usage, dating from about 1600, also appears in the oft-quoted shuffle off this mortal coil, from Shakespeare's Hamlet (3:1), where it means "become freed from the turmoil of life," that is, "die."
2. Move away reluctantly, dragging one's feet, as in The prisoners shuffled off to their work detail. [Late 1500s]
See also: off, shuffle
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

shuffle off this mortal coil

die. literary
Shuffle off this mortal coil is a quotation from Shakespeare 's Hamlet. This mortal coil is sometimes used independently to mean ‘the fact or state of being alive’, with the suggestion that this is a troublesome state, since coil retains here its archaic sense of ‘turmoil’.
1986 Dudley Moore Off-Beat He was just one of a number of distinguished composers who have shuffled off their mortal coil in a variety of unusual ways.
See also: coil, mortal, off, shuffle, this
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

shuffle off this mortal ˈcoil

(old-fashioned or humorous) die: They believe that when they shuffle off this mortal coil their souls will become stars.This expression comes from Shakespeare’s play Hamlet.
See also: coil, mortal, off, shuffle, this
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

shuffle off

v.
1. To go with short sliding steps, without or barely lifting the feet: The sleepy children shuffled off to bed.
2. To leave; depart: Toward the end of the evening, the guests shuffled off one by one.
3. To rid oneself of something; dispose of or relocate something: I have not been able to shuffle off my embarrassment. The computer program automatically shuffles the outdated files off to another disk.
4. To evade or shirk something, such as a responsibility: He shuffled off his responsibilities and went to the beach. She shuffled her work off onto others because she wasn't feeling well.
See also: off, shuffle
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

shuffle off this mortal coil

Die. This phrase that appears in Hamlet combines the archaic meaning of two words. “Shuffle” meant “rid,” while “coil” meant “troubles.” As Shakespeare put it, “What dreams may come / When we have shuffled off this mortal coil / Must give us pause.”
See also: coil, mortal, off, shuffle, this
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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References in periodicals archive ?
Colford noted that the slideshow feed included a warning that it contained graphic content and an image of a marine being mortally wounded.
Bernard's father after seeing the image of his mortally wounded son said he opposed its publication, saying it was disrespectful to his son's memory.
His candidacy also co-opted and thus largely neutered the appeal of the People's Party, which had been mortally threatening Democratic hegemony in the South.
The crew of the leading boat attempted to pull out, but after the second volley all were mortally wounded.
Even though Chapman was mortally wounded his team credits him with saving their lives.
Its tragic drift is bookended by a pair of GWs: Bush, recognizably smug even in a few blotches of oil paint, and Washington, a la Gilbert Stuart but mortally disappointed.
All these men's missions stand out under this requirement--rescuing friends under intense fire while badly wounded themselves, picking up burning flares in a mortally damaged aircraft, throwing themselves on live grenades, returning to the fight against enemy aircraft even though low on fuel and facing superior numbers.
9 officers were mortally wounded from shots to the torso.
She faced overseeing the performances and social events of the Bayreuth Festival while her mortally ill father lay close by.
The men, one of them from Wales, were under siege by several hundred locals at a police station north of Basra when one of them was mortally wounded.
The meaning is clear enough, however: a mortally wounded man appeals for the mercy of God in the moments it takes him between his falling from his horse and his lying dead on the ground.
(Is dull looking for spokesmen?) If I were a gay man, I'd be mortally offended at the slim pickin's on the beefcake buffet.
Lazy writers locked into adverbial cliches write, correctly happily married, finely tuned, fatally flawed, mortally wounded and easily duped--all without the hyphen; in each case, the second half of the compound is a past participle."
This scenario is evident in the news stories that transpired after the 1998 death of the New Jersey State Police dog Solo, mortally wounded in the line of duty.
When AT&T split itself into three companies--AT&T, Lucent and NCR--in the 1996 "trivestiture," it appeared that NCR was mortally wounded.